The relationship between part-time online faculty's technological, pedagogical, and content knowledge and student grades

 

 

Abstract: 

Current research from 2010-2016 indicates online learner grades have dropped at for- profit virtual institutions. During this same period, part-time online faculty made up for 80-90% of online faculty at for-profit virtual institutions. There is evidence of low online learner grades in an era of increased use of part-time online faculty. The purpose of this quantitative non-experimental study was to examine the relationship between seven self-reported predictor variables of part-time online faculty working at a private for-profit virtual institution and the criterion variable, online learners’ grades. A total of 81 out of 148 faculty members participated in the TPACK Survey. Multiple linear regressions and a Pearson r correlation coefficient were used to analyze data. Results of the analyses indicated the seven self-reported predictor variables of technological, pedagogical, and content knowledge of part-time online instructors did not predict online learners’ grades. Study findings imply that the domains of technological, pedagogical, and content knowledge of part-time online instructors do not account for low online learners’ grades. Close analysis of other predictor variables that may account for low online learner grades is recommended.

This publication has been peer reviewed.
Publication Type: 
Dissertation
Authors: 
Wadad Kaaki
Year of Publication: 
2016
Journal, Book, Magazine or Other Publication Title: 
The relationship between part-time online faculty's technological, pedagogical, and content knowledge and student grades
Publisher: 
ProQuest
Date Published: 
Saturday, May 28, 2016
Place Published: 
ProQuest
Publication Language: 
English
Boyer's Domain: 

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