EMPATHETIC DESIGN: A SUSTAINABLE APPROACH TO SCHOOL CHANGE

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Rita Hartman, Ed.D.

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Rita Hartman
First and Last Name: 
Rita Hartman

History

Member for
5 years 1 month
Phone: 
(520) 250-8404
Current and Ongoing Research Interests: 

The purpose of the qualitative content analysis research will be to explore and describe how school leaders characterize a day in the life of a student from personal experiences, observations, and reflections revealed in archival blogs.  The anticipated outcome is to build on the existing literature and provide insights and knowledge that may be used to improve the educational experience for students.  The study is grounded in empathetic design thinking, socio-cultural theory, and constructivist theory.  Empathetic design thinking is where empathy for the user experiences and needs improves design.  The findings may provide schools moving to technolognologically driven learning platforms with valuable information on the humanistic aspect of designing strategies, techniques, and support structures to assist teachers in effectively and successfully embracing the innovation. 

Publications: 
Empathetic design: A sustainable approach to school change
Career professionals reflections on early exposure to music education and training: A narrative inquiry
School leaders' reflective blogs inspire systemic change: A narrative inquiry
University of Phoenix Courses: 
COM/705
PHL/700R
LDR/711A
DOC/721R
DOC/722
DOC/731R
DOC/732R
DOC/733
DOC/734
RES/711
RES/722A
Professional Bio: 
I retired after many wonderful years in public education; the last six spent as a middle school principal, and started perusing my passion of working with adult learners and leaders from around the world engaging in scholarly pursuits and research projects. Academically, I have facilitated doctoral classes in the online environment for over fifteen years. I love being able to teach in my pajamas although I do enjoy getting into my business casual to facilitate doctoral residencies. I am a past member of the SAS Global Program Council, the EDD Academic Council, and have served as an Academic Chair for the EDD program. One of my greatest joys is working with doctoral learners as they define, develop, and complete their proposal/dissertation. There is an amazing sense of pride and accomplishment that you get when you know you have been part of the journey as a learner moves into the role of a Doctor! In my role as a Fellow in the Center for Educational Communication and Technology during 2017-2018, I successfully led three teams to completion of research projects resulting in publications and presentations. Professionally, I am engaged in exploring the concept of Question-Thinking (Adams, 2010). Q-Thinking is based on the premises that great results being with great questions and just about any problem can be solved with enough right questions. I am also involved in using Appreciative Inquiry as a process for building a learning community focused on the strengths and potentials of each individual of the community with the goal of inspiring positive change. I presented a session titled “Developing Scholars, Practitioners, and Leaders through a Collaborative, Constructive, and Creative Thinking Process” at AI (Appreciative Inquiry) World Conference, which brought together my three passions - AI, Q-Storming, and the doctoral journey. I also had the honor of presenting with two of my esteemed colleagues at the Quality Research Management Conference “Finding the Art of the Possible: Generating Alternatives through Imagination.” I volunteer at the Tucson Wildlife Center whose goal is to rescue, rehabilitate, and release wild life. I volunteer in the educational program, Friday at the Fort, am part of a charity group, Twelve Who Care, and am on the board of KIND (Kids with Individual Needs and/or Disabilities – The KIND home). When I am not in the "school" environment or working on special projects, I enjoy time with my family, do a little painting, read mystery and suspense books, and collect antiques.
Degrees Completed: 
Doctoral Degree
Educational Leadership
Northern Arizona University
1995
Academic Appointments: 
Global Council School of Advance Studies
Member
Educational Leadership Doctoral Program School of Advance Studies
Member
Academic Review Board School of Advance Studies
Reviewer
Fellowship
School of Advanced Studies - Center for Educational Instruction and Technology
Honors and Awards: 
Distinguished Teaching Award
Teacher Education Program, University of Phoenix Southern Arizona Campus
Outstanding Faculty Teacher Education
University of Phoenix Southern Arizona Tucson, Arizona
Professional Education: 
Professional Suffix: 
Ed.D.
Primary College or School: 
Members: 
Real name: 

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Elizabeth Johnston, Ed.D.

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First and Last Name: 
Elizabeth Johnston

History

Member for
5 years 1 month
Phone: 
(925) 988-0450
Current and Ongoing Research Interests: 

I am interested in learning more about how the arts open learning potentials.

I am interested in developing better learning opportunities for students in online or CSCL environments.

I am interested in how visual, auditory, and kinesthetic materials might improve learning in general and particularly an online learning experience.

I am interested in learning more about qualitative research, particularly content analysis.

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The CEITR has accepted my research fellowship proposal for 2016-17.  The article was accepted for publication in August, 2017.  I am currently developing a special interest group: The Arts: Teaching and Learning.  A call for research participants will go out during September, 2017.  Several other research projects are nearing completion and will be submitted for publication.  I will present three papers at the AECT conference in Jacksonville, Florida in November, 2017.

Elizabeth Johnston, Ed.D.

 

 

Publications: 
The power of images: Exploring the edges of an alternative paradigm
May the odds be ever with you
Symposium Introduction (to Design)
Appreciative surprise: A strategic approach to generating reflexive responses to meet the challenges of 21st-century corporate citizenship
Appreciative inquiry: Researching greatness
Emancipating Reflexive Voice in Developing Contemporary Graduate Identity: Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management
Making Sense of Differing Experiences of Identity in America
Still Alice
Exploring pedagogical foundations of existing virtual reality (VR) educational applications: A content analysis study
Witnesses to transformation: Family member experiences providing individualized music to their relatives with dementia
Virtual Reality Pedagogy Considerations in Learning Environments
University of Phoenix Courses: 
DOC/733
DOC/734
DOC/721R
DOC/722
DOC/721R
DOC/740R
DOC/736A
DOC/737
DOC/731R
DOC/732R
RES/711
RES/722A
EDD/731
EDD/712
PHL/700R
Professional Bio: 
Elizabeth is the Associate Chair for the Center for Educational and Instructional Research (CEITR) and faculty member at the School for Advanced Studies (SAS) at University of Phoenix. Co-leader of Teaching and Learning with the Arts Research (TLAR) Special Interest Group (SIG) and the Diversity Research Labs (1 and 2). Qualitative researcher interested in online education, technology and the arts. Currently working on Arts based instructional and curricular strategies for working with virtual educational applications and the narratives of artists. The goal is to provide useful new knowledge for a wide audience of educators, policy makers, and researchers. Elizabeth has been teaching in Higher Education for 21 years and at University of Phoenix® for 14 years, including successfully chairing over 40 dissertations. Passionate about education, Elizabeth spent 25 years in K-12 education where she was a teacher, department chair, principal, and central office administrator. At the University of Phoenix, Elizabeth has worked as a member of the Global Council (serving the School of Advanced Studies (SAS) and the Academic Cabinet (serving the entire University). Elizabeth was an editor for the Media Symposium at the Journal of Psychological Issues in Organizational Culture for the years 2015-2016 and a peer reviewer for the Journal of Leadership Studies, Journal of Psychological Issues in Organizational Culture. Elizabeth earned a doctoral degree in Educational Leadership from Loyola, Chicago, and an MA and BA from Michigan State University in Fine Arts and Education. She earned a Type 75 certificate in Leadership (Superintendent's level) from University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana.
Degrees Completed: 
Doctoral Degree
Educational Leadership
Loyola of Chicago
1994
Masters Degree
Art Education and Special Education
Michigan State University
1982
Bachelors Degree
Double major in Fine Arts and Psychology
Michigan State University
1976
Leadership: Type 75 Leadership Certificate
University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana, IL
1986
Academic Appointments: 
Senior Research Fellow
School of Advanced Studies: Center for Educational and Instructional Technology Research (CEITR)
Duration: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015
Honors and Awards: 
Global Council, School of Advanced Studies, University of Phoenix
Subject Matter Expert for ACCESS (incoming doctoral learner course sequence) curriculum development
Academic Cabinet, School of Advanced Studies, University of Phoenix
Research Fellowship in Teaching & Learning, University of Phoenix
Top Ten Dissertation chairs
Research Faculty of the Year
Research Hub: KWB conference
Year Awarded: 
2018
Professional Education: 
Professional Suffix: 
Ed.D.
Primary College or School: 

Email

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Marcia (Marty) Hill, PhD

First and Last Name: 
Marcia (Marty) Hill

History

Member for
5 years 3 weeks
Phone: 
(812) 779-8482
Current and Ongoing Research Interests: 

Program Evaluation and Assessment

Praxis II and Teacher Preparation 

Social Attitudes Towards Menstruation

 

 

 

Publications: 
Empathetic Design: A Sustainable Approach to School Change
Prevalent leadership characteristics among principals/lead teachers in alternative education programs for at-risk youth
Transformational leadership and Indiana at-risk youth
Are leaders in effective alternative education programs setting a precedence?
The magic 8 ball
An educational bistro: Satire on educational leadership
The principles of an effective alternative school.
Characteristics of a curricular leader
University of Phoenix Courses: 
DOC/700
LDR/711A
DOC/705R
RES/709
DOC/722
DOC/733
DOC/734
COM/705
CUR/711
CUR/721
CUR/731
PHL/700R
RES/711
Professional Bio: 
Marcia Hill is Lead Faculty-Area Chair for the ACCESS Program in the School of Advanced Studies. Marcia holds an Associates Degree in Commercial and Industrial Photography from Indiana Vocational Technical College, a Bachelor of Arts in Elementary Education and a Masters in the Art of Teaching with an emphasis in secondary administration from Oakland City University. Marcia currently facilitates classes in the ACCESS program and as Lead Faculty Area Chair enjoys collaborating with other faculty to ensure success for students beginning the doctoral program. Marcia serves as dissertation chair and serves on dissertation committees with a focus on qualitative research studies. Marcia has been published in the Discourse and Communication for Sustainable Education Journal, the Journal for Liberal Arts and Sciences, and the Association for Alternative Education Journal. Marcia is currently involved in a program evaluation of the ACCESS program focusing on accessible student resources and student retention. Marcia collaborated with an alumni and co-presented at the Rocky Mountain Educational Research Association in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Marcia has been a long-time member of the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
Degrees Completed: 
Doctoral Degree
Educational Leadership, Administration, and Foundations
Indiana State University
2005
Masters Degree
Secondary Administration
Oakland City University
2000
Bachelors Degree
Elementary Education
Oakland City University
1993
Academic Appointments: 
Lead Faculty - Area Chair: ACCESS Program, SAS
University of Phoenix
Duration: 
Friday, June 26, 2015
Honors and Awards: 
Professional Education: 
Professional Suffix: 
PhD
Primary College or School: 

The purpose of the descriptive case study was to understand how school leaders characterize their experiences when shadowing a student for the day.  

Project Status: 
Project Manuscript Accepted for Publication
Project Funding Description: 
Fellowship project
empathetic design thinking
school reform
School Leadership
constructivism
socio-cultural theory
sustainable education

Comments

Elizabeth Johnston's picture Elizabeth Johnston | November 25, 2017 7:07 pm MST

A descriptive case study approach employing a content analysis of the blogs of 36 school leaders who took part in the 2016-2017 Shadow a Student Challenge project and follow up interviews of five of the school leaders were used to explore and describe how an empathetic design approach provided a greater vantage point for school leaders to gain a deeper insight into the school experience by viewing school through the eyes of students.  School leaders play a key role in establishing the culture, climate, and educational outcomes within their school environments.  An empathetic design approach to school reform provides a stronger point for initiating change than an atmosphere focused on evaluation and accountability.  Taking a school-based approach, encouraging school leaders to immerse themselves in the school experience, provides an opportunity for school leaders to gain empathy and insights foundational in generating meaningful and innovative change leading to sustainable education. Three major themes emerged from the findings: 1) pace and structure of the school day, 2) student learning experience, and 3) learning environment influences student motivation, energy, and openness to learning.