Recruitment and Retention Attributes Important to New Graduate Registered Nurses Employed on Adult Acute Care Medical Surgical Units, A Mixed Methods Approach.

Recruitment and Retention Attributes Important to New Graduate Registered Nurses Employed on Adult Acute Care Medical Surgical Units, A Mixed Methods Approach.

The purpose is to elucidate the recruitment and retention variables important to new graduates who accept their first professional nursing position on an adult medical surgical unit. This work builds on the knowledge of a study completed in the fall of 2014 and the work of Dr. Cynthia Bienemy, Director of the Louisiana Center for Nursing. This proposal is two-fold: (1) To determine what recruitment parameters new graduates find appealing; and (2) To explore the attributes new graduates identify as pivotal to remain in a medical surgical position after one year. While current data is pivotal to understanding the educational and work force needs of the recent graduate, it does not provide employers with the fundamental principles required to attract and retain new nurse graduates to adult Medical Surgical Units. Quantitative and qualitative data will be collected, triangulated and aggregated. Once the data has been analyzed, qualitative items will be developed based on the nurses’ responses, approved by the IRB, and focus groups will be convened to further elucidate factors related to work satisfaction. The expected outcomes of this study include: 1. Explicate the top ten drivers of new graduate decision making when selecting their first professional position in a medical surgical unit in an acute care hospital; 2. Elucidate the key parameters that promote nurse satisfaction and dissatisfaction related to the new graduates’ willingness to remain on a medical surgical acute care unit after one year; and 3. Develop a toolkit which Louisiana hospitals can use to integrate key findings into their personnel hiring and retention programs. Data collection completed April 2016. Tool Kit development to begin May 2016.
Sponsor: 
Health Works Commission
Submission Date: 
July 31, 2015
Funding Status: 
Research Funded
Award Date: 
September 15, 2015