Ethics and Health Care Administrators’ Decision Making: A Qualitative Symphonological Grounded Theory Study​

The presentation documented was based on the primary author's grounded theory based dissertation that developed a theory for understanding the role played by ethical considerations within the context of health care administrators’ decision- making processes. A new substantive theory emerged from the study that bridged a gap in the literature - a symphonological , bioethical framework for assisting health care administrators in their decision- making process. The research presented contributed knowledge to the limited research currently available relative to the need for reconciling business operations and clinical practices in health care settings.

University of Phoenix, College of Doctoral Studies
Scholastica ILoghalu, Louise Underdahl, Richard Hall, Edward Paluch
Presentation Date: 
Monday, June 10, 2019
Event or Conference: 
Knowledge Without Boundaries Research Summit
Presentation Type: 
Paper Presentation
Boyer's Domain: 
Presentation Attachment(s): 
Presentation Location: 
University of Phoenix
4025 S. Riverpoint Pkwy
Phoenix, AZ 85040
United States
Notes: 
This presentation was derived and adapted from a dissertation by one of the University's students for the Knowledge Without Boundaries Summit on June 10, 2019
Associated Awards: 
N/A
Abstract: 
ABSTRACT "The goal of this qualitative grounded theory study was to develop a theory to understand the role of ethics in health care administrators’ decision- making process. Health care administrators need to understand the role of ethics in decision making to solve ethical dilemmas and reconcile the demands required of business operations and clinical practices in the health care industry. The study involved collecting qualitative data on health care administrators’ ethical dilemmas using multiple sources of information from scholarly peer-reviewed documents, reports, public records, and journal articles on the ethical decision- making process. The triangulated data underwent analysis using NVivo10 and the results indicated themes divided into five main categories and three subcategories with outliers. The new substantive theory that emerged from the data analysis bridged the gap in literature that lacked symphonology, which is a concept required in health care administrators’ context-based decision making. The model is a symphonological bioethical framework presented to assist health care administrators in their decision- making process. Six bioethical standards are fidelity, objectivity, freedom, beneficence, self-assertion, and autonomy. Cost reduction, recruitment of competent employees, and retention of talented staff can improve the ability to provide quality health care. This grounded theory research design adds knowledge to the limited research on health care administrators’ ethical decision making through a focus on the need to reconcile business operations and clinical practices in health care settings".