Ogbu revisited: Unpacking high achieving African American girls high school experiences

This qualitative study examined the applicability of Ogbu's cultural theory to the self-described experiences of high-achieving African American high school girls.

Abstract: 

How African American girls cope and excel amidst the discriminations and inequities they experience within U.S. educational systems has not been widely discussed in the body of research about African Americans’ schooling experiences. In this study, the researchers examined the applicability of Ogbu’s cultural–ecological theory to the self-described school experiences of eight high-achieving African American high school girls. Using an inductive analysis of interviews, focus groups, journal, and field notes, this article draws attention to the role that school policies and practices, caring adults play, and how the participants’ negotiated academic and racial identities contributed to their academic success.

This publication has been peer reviewed.
Publication Type: 
Journal Article
Authors: 
Archer-Banks, D. A. M. & Behar-Horenstein, L. S.
Year of Publication: 
2012
Journal, Book, Magazine or Other Publication Title: 
Urban Education, 47(1), 198-223.
Volume: 
47
Issue: 
1
Pages: 
198-223
Date Published: 
Sunday, January 1, 2012
Publication Language: 
English

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