SAS Faculty Researcher Spotlight: Dale Crowe

SAS Faculty Researcher Spotlight: Dale Crowe

This week's spotlight is two-part, and features a doctoral student and dissertation chair. View the other spotlight to learn about the second half of this awesome team!


Dale Crowe, Ph.D, currently serves as an Associate Faculty, teaching Year 1 and Year 3 doctoral residency, and as a dissertation chair within the School of Advanced Studies. He has been with University of Phoenix for over nine years. Dr. Crowe is also a Research Fellow for the Center for Educational and Instructional Technology Research (CEITR). Outside of his teaching responsibilities he has worked as a consultant in the field of information technology for over 20 years. He also served as a Captain in the U.S. Army.

View his user profile here on the Research Hub >>         

As a research fellow for CEITR, Dr. Crowe serves as Team Leader for the Artificial Augmented Intelligence/Virtual Reality Research Lab.  He is actively working on three research projects.

Dr. Crowe works closely with his current and former students in his research. Recently, a journal article he coauthored with current dissertation student Martin “Marty” LaPierre was published in a special issue of the International Journal of Conceptual Structures and Smart Applications titled Transforming Learning with Smart Technology. The article is titled “Augmented Artificial Intelligence and Virtual Reality: Next Generational Users of Instructional Tools for K-12 and Higher Education.” This work has been presented at the Council of College and Military Educators at three different symposiums. It has also been presented at the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) at their international conference in October 2016

He is also working with graduate Shaila Wong, for whom he served as dissertation chair, on an article entitled, “Persistence and Engagement Among First Year Hispanic Students.” 

Within CEITR, he is leading a team working on an article titled, “Narrative Inquiry: How Teachers from the Troops to Teachers Program Use Artificial Augmented Intelligence.” Here he is working again with student Marty LaPierre, as well as University of Phoenix faculty Mimi Stout. They have also submitted a proposal to present at a concurrent session of the Council of College and Military Educators at their upcoming symposium in March, 2018.  

With student LaPierre and CEITR’s Research Chair, Dr. Mansureh Kebritchi, he published an article in the AECT journal by the name of Tech Trends in the September 2017 issue. The article is titled, “Knowledge Based Artificial Augmentation Intelligence Technology: Next Step in Academic Instructional Tools for Distance Learning.”

Dr. Crowe’s hope for the last article is to bring awareness to K-12 educational instrutions, as well as to educators in general, about the significance of Augmented Intelligence and Virtually Reality tools and programs, and the impact they will have in the classroom for Millennials, Generation Z, and beyon.  He said, “In our opinion these technologies will change the face of how technology is delivered to education.”

When asked what advice he would give to faculty or students considering beginning work on research projects, Dr. Crowe had this to say:

To the faculty, don’t sell your students short.  You may be surprised just how knowledgeable and valuable they can be to your research efforts.

“To students, you may write a journal article and/or put in a proposal to speak at a conference.  Don’t get dejected if your article or proposal is rejected the first time around.  Learn from it and submit it again.  Remember, the phrase, ‘You can’t catch fish unless you go fishing.’”

Thank you, Dr. Crowe, for your exemplary support of your dissertation students. We wish you the best of luck in your upcoming work.

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