The Greater Yellowstone Sights and Sounds Archive: A New Tool for Wildlife Researchers and Educators

The research methodology included perceptions gathered from museum volunteer experience, describing world traits for altruistic rewards or fulfillment, other than financial.  Leadership performance outcomes reflected existential phenomenological research methods in an account of museum volunteer perceptions of differing spheres of experience and backgrounds.  A created space for experiencing leadership emerged in museum volunteers (3).  Personal transformation, revealed during the production of a museum digital collection, will expand this article description.  A purposeful project, creating a digital repository for video media, supported mediated meaning, deeper understanding, reflective thinking, and meaning translator or mindset coaching strategies, evidence of leadership outcomes, advancing museum education outreach for personal and transformative change in a social community (O’Rourke, Haimovitz, Ballweber, Dweck, & Popovic, 2014).  Interactions included volunteers, forming an interdependent working group and creating successful leaders.  

 

Abstract: 

The term existential phenomenology, used in this setting, applied to a metaphor, representing leadership development.  Through the vehicle of creating the museum Archive, interdependent group interactions resulted in leadership understanding and the story.  The research methodology included perceptions gathered from museum volunteer experience, describing world traits for altruistic rewards or fulfillment, other than financial.  Leadership performance outcomes reflected existential phenomenological research methods in an account of museum volunteer perceptions of differing spheres of experience and backgrounds.  A created space for experiencing leadership emerged in museum volunteers (3).  Personal transformation, revealed during the production of a museum digital collection, will expand this article description.  A purposeful project, creating a digital repository for video media, supported mediated meaning, deeper understanding, reflective thinking, and meaning translator or mindset coaching strategies, evidence of leadership outcomes, advancing museum education outreach for personal and transformative change in a social community (O’Rourke, Haimovitz, Ballweber, Dweck, & Popovic, 2014).  Interactions included volunteers, forming an interdependent working group and creating successful leaders.  The Draper Natural History Museum at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West housed the finding guide and digital research tool - The Greater Yellowstone Sights and Sounds Archive:  A New Tool for Wildlife Researchers and Educators.  The nature of perceptions involved three leader volunteers, reporting ideas of leadership, as they cataloged video recordings of Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem wildlife, landscapes, and land and wildlife managers since 2000.  The nature of observations involved thematic inquiry, expanding potential for purpose, time, expertise, commitment, dedication, and collaboration in a personal transformation leadership style.  Integrated leader volunteer qualities, virtues and outcomes advanced, breaking down leadership experience into parts.  During interviews, the conversation about the leadership experience created understanding connections between experience and mediated meaning.  Creating understanding and mediated meaning supported leadership.  In an adaptive or continuous figure-8 leadership style, leader volunteer interview perception descriptions included positive constructs, sometimes referred to as virtues, such as hope, resiliency, efficacy, optimism, happiness, and well-being (Kavelin-Popov, Popov, & Kavelin, 2007;  Latham 2013; Rozuel & Kakabadse, 2010; Uleman, Rim, Saribay, & Kressel, 2012; Whillans, 2016; Yammarino, Salas, Serban, and Shirreffs, 2012; Yukl, 2012).   Working together, leader volunteers led ethical stances and recognized virtues of collaborative interactions.  This purposeful project broadened and built a tangible outcome, which resulted in positive emotions, expanding awareness and behaviors, and encouraging novel, varied, and exploratory thoughts and actions (Avolio, Walumbwa, and Weber, 2009).  Volunteers experienced phenomena associated with their ideas of leadership experience.  Human change represented the ultimate goal of the creative process of leadership.  Memories of past meaning, reflective thinking, and mindset coaching, possibly led to a transformative social change.  The project changed the way the volunteers thought about their work. The creative process may lead to making the world and society better (Gardner and James, 2015; Leadership Program Outcomes, 2016; Rundle, Weinstein, Gardner & Mucinskas, 2013; Sablonniere, Bourgeois, and Najih, 2013; Van Manen, 2014).  Demonstrated leadership performance outcomes showed commitment and willingness to work for the good of others.  A sense of virtue supported an ethical stance, thinking about how people relate to each other, and how personal transformative social change expanded potential for community involvement (Fine, 2016; Hunick, Glloway, Joyner, Owen, & Constantine, 2017; Kliewer & Priest, 2017; Komives, 2009; Noonan & Gardner, 2014; Priest & Kliewer, 2017; Sadri, 2012).  What started as a museum project, the Archive, evolved into a civic investment of time, creating and advancing leadership though community-engaged scholarship.  This multi-faceted approach included interview questions which expanded awareness of personal leadership abilities.  Community learning and engagement helped produce volunteer leadership understanding through a lens of leadership for public good through working together, organizing and implementing learning structures and developing critical capacity for social change.  The leader volunteers became aware of their power and knowledge through this practice.  Participating in the leadership process helped organize group dynamics and personal leadership attributes which energized this group of volunteers, as they worked together, identified issues, created new leadership models for social change, and helped the volunteers act.  Leadership inquiry revealed shared knowledge, highlighting ways systems exist, operate, and reproduce themselves.  Knowledge became shared experiences of knowing.  Leader volunteers impacted the ability to question values and processes for human change in social responsibility, action, justice, and human rights (Hunick, Glloway, Joyner, Owen, & Constantine, 2017; Kliewer & Priest, 2017; Priest & Kliewer, 2017). 

 

This publication has been peer reviewed.
Publication Type: 
Book Chapter
Authors: 
Nancy L. Bailey, Ph. D.
Year of Publication: 
2018
Journal, Book, Magazine or Other Publication Title: 
THE GREATER YELLOWSTONE SIGHTS AND SOUNDS ARCHIVE: A NEW TOOL FOR WILDLIFE RESEARCHERS AND EDUCATORS
Section: 
Chapter 2
Date Published: 
Friday, March 30, 2018
Place Published: 
IGI Global
Publication Language: 
English
Boyer's Domain: 

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