Moral Injury in Women Veterans: A Grounded Theory Study

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Daniel Roberts

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Dr. Daniel Roberts
First and Last Name: 
Daniel Roberts

History

Member for
6 years 10 months
Phone: 
(910) 690-5964
Current and Ongoing Research Interests: 

My current research projects:

How Male Military Chaplains of Different Religions Provide Emotional and Spiritual Support to Women Soldiers: A Case Study

Male military chaplains face a variety of challenges when it comes to providing emotional and spiritual support to female soldiers.  Religious laws restrict Jewish and Islamic chaplains from being alone with women to whom they are not married (Berzon, n.d.; Padela & Pozo, 2011).  All military chaplains operate in dual roles as religious leaders and commissioned officers, and there are times when chaplains are in a power imbalance with counselees (Garland & Argueta, 2010; Norton & Soloski, 2015).  Chaplains must also maintain complete confidentiality with those they counsel (Norton & Soloski, 2015).  

This qualitative descriptive case study will chronicle similar and contrasting ways in which male chaplains of different religions provide pastoral support to female soldiers.  In the following pages, this proposal describes the problem, purpose, significance, and research questions of the study.  Study procedures and a brief literature review are also provided.
Publications: 
The Comprehensive Female Soldier Support Model
A Comprehensive Plan for Providing Chaplaincy Support to Wounded Female Soldiers: A Delphi Study
Professional Bio: 
Dr. Roberts joined the U.S. Army in 1989 and served for 11 years with deployments to Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Haiti, Macedonia, and Kosovo. In May of 2000, he left the Army to start a civilian career. After the tragic events on 9/11, he reentered the service in the Army Reserves as a Chaplain Assistant. Dr. Roberts returned to active duty in 2006, and is currently the Noncommissioned Officer in Charge (NCOIC) of the chaplain section at the United States Army Civil Affairs and Psychological Operations Command (USACAPOC). As such, he oversees a variety of products and services from the chaplain directorate, including research on indigenous religions and cultures, advice and training on the subject of sexual assault prevention, pastoral counseling to unit soldiers, and doctrine development for both the U.S. and Canadian chaplaincies. As a proud UOP alum, his dissertation, entitled "A Comprehensive Plan for Providing Chaplaincy Support to Wounded Female Soldiers: A Delphi Study,” integrated the needs of wounded female soldiers and the expertise of female chaplains to develop a cutting-edge model of support for women in the military. He continues to conduct research oriented towards the intersectionality of gender, race, culture, religion, and organizations.
Degrees Completed: 
Bachelors Degree
Management and Ethics
John Wesley College
2003
Masters Degree
Information Systems
Strayer University
2005
Doctoral Degree
DM/IST
University of Phoenix
2016
Program of Study: 
Academic Appointments: 
Honors and Awards: 
Dissertation of Year Award
University of Phoenix
Year Awarded: 
2017
Professional Education: 
Primary College or School: 
Areas of Research Interest: 
Members: 
Real name: 

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Joann Kovacich, PhD

First and Last Name: 
Joann Kovacich

History

Member for
7 years 7 months
Current and Ongoing Research Interests: 

I continue to actively design new research projects with former students and colleagues in my areas of expertise and interest as a qualitative cultural and medical anthropologist. 

I am currently working on the following projects:

  • Moral Injury in Women Veterans: A Grounded Theory Study, University of Phoenix, 2018 (in collaboration with alumnus Daniel Roberts, DM)

  • Health Care Providers and Mental Illness Stigma: A Meta-Ethnography, Mental Health and Psychologocial Well-Being Special Interest Group, Center for Health and Nursing Research, University of Phoenix, 2018 (Collaborative)

  • How Male Military Chaplains Of Different Religions Provide Emotional And Spiritual Support To Women Soldier: A Case Study  (in collaboration with alumnus Daniel Roberts, DM)
  • Geriatric palliative care nurse preparedness: A case study (in collaboration with alumnus LaToya Lewis-Pierre Ed.D-CI, MSN, RN and faculty colleague, Linda Amankwaa, Ph.D, RN, FAAN)
  • Nursing ethics and stem cell research (in collaboration with alumnus Patricia Walker, DHA)

 

 

Publications: 
Communication Methods with Limited English Proficiency Research Participants to Acquire Informed Consent During Clinical Trials
A Phenomenological Investigation of the Problem of Adult Student Attrition in Community College Online Courses,
Evidence Based Complementary Therapies for Palliative Care On-line Module: Acupuncture Module Qualitative Analysis
Interdisciplinary Communication and Collaboration Among Physicians, Nurses and Unlicensed Assistive Personnel
Workplace Readiness of New ICU Nurses: A Grounded Theory Study
A Qualitative Study of Medication Adherence among Older Adults in San Juan, Puerto Rico
Improving African American college students’ participation in study abroad
A needs assessment for health care professionals in the detection, intervention and interdisciplinary treatment of Bulimia Nervosa using focus group methodology
Harvard Geriatric Education Center evaluation model for self-study on-line learning modules
Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias On-line Learning Module Instructor Manual
New learning programs in cognitive vitality, Alzheimer’s Disease and related dementias
The Comprehensive Female Soldier Support Model: A Delphi Study.
Grounded Theory for Nursing Workforce Research: Reflections and Challenges.
Nursing Ethics in Stem Cell Research: Perceived Attitudes and Beliefs of Nurses.
Modifying the Qualitative Delphi Technique to Develop the Female Soldier Support Model
Male Chaplains and Female Soldiers: Are There Gender and Denominational Differences in Military Pastoral Care?
University of Phoenix Courses: 
DOC/722
DOC/733
DOC/734
DOC/733A
DOC/733B
DOC/734A
DOC/734B
Professional Bio: 
I am an independent researcher and consultant. I have been with the School of Advanced Studies, UOPX since 2007. As an applied medical anthropologist my areas of specialization and interest include interdisciplinary health care delivery, heath care and technology, alternative health care, aging, ethnicity, gender, health care policy and law, intergenerational relationships and informal and formal support systems. I conduct ethnographic, case study and focus group research on ethnicity, aging, health care delivery, patient/client-practitioner communication and allied health professions in rural and urban contexts. I am also an experienced program evaluator. As an off shoot of my investigation in alternative health care, I am also pursuing the interrelationship between pets and health, dog cognitive evolution, and dog health innovation as a parallel to innovation in human health care interventions and wellness practice. I design and teach on-line problem based learning modules in aging, interdisciplinary health care, culture and health, and anthropology and have facilitated many service learning projects and community profiles putting theory into practice. While serving as Principle Investigator and Project Director of the federally funded Interdisciplinary Rural Health Care Project in Maine, I co-produced an interactive training CD for health care professionals on aging in rural areas. Serving as Director of Distance Education for the Harvard Geriatric Education Center, Harvard Medical School in Massachusetts, I designed several self-study modules for health care professionals in the area of Alzheimer research and transcultural communication. More recently colleagues and I have just finished Phase I of an NIH Small Business and Technology Grant to develop online alternative health evidence based best practice for palliative care modules. In addition I served as Book Review Editor for Anthropology and Aging and serve as Article Editor for SAGE Publications.
Degrees Completed: 
Doctoral Degree
Law, Policy and Society with a concentration in Culture and Health
NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY
1993
Masters Degree
Double Major: Anthropology/Ethnology and "Empirische Kulturwissenschaft" (Empirical Cultural Studies)
EBERHARD KARLS UNIVERSITAET TUEBINGEN, Germany (with Honors)
1982
Bachelors Degree
Double Major: German and Anthropology
KENT STATE (Cum Laude)
1978
Academic Appointments: 
Faculty Associate
School of Advanced Studies
Honors and Awards: 
University of Phoenix Honorarium for Publication
University of Phoenix Excellence in Publication Award
Secretary of Health & Human Services Award in Innovations in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention
Professional Education: 
Professional Suffix: 
PhD
Primary College or School: 
Type of Project: 

Primary Investigator: Daniel L. Roberts

Secondary Investigators: Joann Kovacich, Walker Ladd

Moral injury is a topic that is getting considerable attention within the military chaplaincy and veteran research fields.  Multiple definitions for moral injury exist and there are two prominent instruments for determining if a person experienced a potentially moral injurious event.  There is no symptomatology instrument for moral injury.  Current definitions and scales were developed using sample populations with few women soldiers in them.  Including the concrete experiences of women is a hallmark of feminist research.  This qualitative grounded theory project will use feminist trauma theory and create an explanatory theory of moral injury as it pertains to U.S. women veterans.  Up to 20 female ex-service members will be interviewed and salient literature will be analyzed.  This study may serve as a precursor to other projects that could further expand the field of women veteran research and develop a symptomatology instrument.

 

Project Status: 
Project in Development
Trauma
veterans
moral injury
grounded theory