Leadership Practices of Elementary Principals Who Have Narrowed the Race Based Academic Achievement Gap

This multi-embadded case study investigates the perspective of effective elementary school principals in Harvest Blossom School District who narrowed the race-based academic achievement gap in reading by increasing their knowledge, skills, and leadership practices.  The unique and ongoing  nature of required training at the district, school, and individual levels on race, ethnicity, and culture, are producing leaders who use specific leadership strategies to increase student achievement.  The district has been involved in this work since 2003, over 14 years and is just now beginnig to see the results of this focus.  

HICE
Bell, Nicole & Schumacher, Jane A.
Presentation Date: 
Tuesday, January 2, 2018
Event or Conference: 
Hawaii International Conference on Education
Presentation Type: 
Paper Presentation
Boyer's Domain: 
Presentation Location: 
Hawaiian Hilton Village Hotel
Honolulu, HI
United States
Abstract: 
case study investigates the perspective of effective elementary school principals in Harvest Blossom School District who narrowed the race-based academic achievement gap in reading by increasing their knowledge, skills, and leadership practices. Data analysis will include the triangulation of focus group, individual interview, and archival search that explores the leadership strategies and application of racially conscious training of participants. Archived data will provide a purposeful criterion sampling of elementary school principals who narrowed the race-based achievement gap by at least 10 percent as measured by state-mandated reading assessments measured by the Transitional Colorado Aptitude Program.  Principals who have not narrowed race-based achievement disparities will not be included in this proposed study because the focus of this proposed study is how elementary school principals narrowed racial achievement disparities in the subject of reading. Critical Race Theory is the theoretical framework supported by the conceptual frameworks of Freire’s critical pedagogy, leadership practices of Marzano, and racial consciousness to structure the discussion of data and results. These experiences may be identified as critical to learning how and why principals need to discuss race and racism in education.