Ho`oponopono: Using Hawaiian Practice to Resolve Conflicts in School Communities

Presentation accepted and approved on July 6, 2018.  Presentation in review by three Hawaiian cultural practitioners.  Final presentation to be uploaded to this site once reviews have been completed.

Abstract:  

Ho`oponopono is an Indigenous Hawaiian practice that is relationship based and is used to set things right between individuals through honest dialogue. Ho`oponopono originally relied on `olelokike (dialogue), to resolve conflicts within the ohana (family). Dekneef (2016) wrote, While the term itself wasn't used by ancient Hawaiians, it is a remnant of a practice, led by kahuna (priests), that believed if someone fell ill it may have stemmed from breaking kapu(spiritual law) and only after admitting wrong and asking for atonement from the gods or from the violated person would the sufferer be physically healed.  While the process of ho’oponopono may seem simple, it requires commitment and involvement by participants in the process.  Ho`oponopono is now used in Hawai`i and in other locations as a conflict resolution practice in private and nonprofit organizations including schools.  

Ho`oponopono reflects Indigenous Hawaiian practice of valuing talking storyor sharing onesperceptions and stories with one another.  The main goal of ho`oponopono is to find resolution for a conflict through dialogue and to forgive one another in order to move forward with ha`aha`a (humility) and lokahi (harmony). There are distinct phases in the ho`oponopono process. The phases of ho`oponopono include: setting the tone and statement of the problem; conversation phase in which participants share their thoughts and feelings; resolution phase including active listening and statements of personal responsibility and forgiveness; closing phase summarizing what has taken place and agreement to move forward.  

Participants in this workshop will: 

Learn history of ho`oponopono in Indigenous Hawaiian culture

Learn phases of ho`oponopono in resolving conflict

Select one of several cases of school based conflict

Practice using the phases of ho`oponopono to resolve cases of conflict

Reflect on process or ho`oponopono and its applicability in their own work situations

Jane A. Schumacher Ed.D.
Presentation Date: 
Friday, July 6, 2018
Event or Conference: 
Hawaii International Conference on Education
Presentation Type: 
Workshop
Boyer's Domain: 
Presentation Location: 
Hilton Hawaiian Village
Honolulu, HI
United States
Abstract: 
Abstract: Ho`oponopono is an Indigenous Hawaiian practice that is relationship based and is used to set things right between individuals through honest dialogue. Ho`oponopono originally relied on `olelokike (dialogue), to resolve conflicts within the ohana (family). Dekneef (2016) wrote, “While the term itself wasn't used by ancient Hawaiians, it is a remnant of a practice, led by kahuna (priests), that believed if someone fell ill it may have stemmed from breaking kapu (spiritual law) and only after admitting wrong and asking for atonement from the gods or from the violated person would the sufferer be physically healed”. While the process of ho’oponopono may seem simple, it requires commitment and involvement by participants in the process. Ho`oponopono is now used in Hawai`i and in other locations as a conflict resolution practice in private and nonprofit organizations including schools. Ho`oponopono reflects Indigenous Hawaiian practice of valuing “talking story” or sharing ones’ perceptions and stories with one another. The main goal of ho`oponopono is to find resolution for a conflict through dialogue and to forgive one another in order to move forward with ha`aha`a (humility) and lokahi (harmony). There are distinct phases in the ho`oponopono process. The phases of ho`oponopono include: setting the tone and statement of the problem; conversation phase in which participants share their thoughts and feelings; resolution phase including active listening and statements of personal responsibility and forgiveness; closing phase summarizing what has taken place and agreement to move forward. Participants in this workshop will: Learn history of ho`oponopono in Indigenous Hawaiian culture Learn phases of ho`oponopono in resolving conflict Select one of several cases of school based conflict Practice using the phases of ho`oponopono to resolve cases of conflict Reflect on process or ho`oponopono and its applicability in their own work situations