edTPA October 22-24

Welcome to the discussion forum for the edTPA Training (October 22-24, 2019).

This area will be used for the following discussion topics that are listed as group assignments. There will be one discussion group for the workshop rather than multiple teams or discussion groups. 
 

Directions:

To participate, please reply to the appropriate discussion question for each day. For example, if you are submitting for Day 1, find the Day 1 discussion question and click reply or reply to a colleague within the Day 1 discussion question. 
David E. Proudfoot's picture David E. Proudfoot | October 22, 2019 8:16 am MST

Day 1:

1. Introduce yourself to your team members.  
  • Share the courses that you teach including the grade levels and content area.
  • Share what you know and/or have learned about edTPA.
dlange1's picture dlange1 | October 22, 2019 9:49 am MST

Hi! My name is Donna Lange and I teacher CUR/515 Critical thinking and Innovative Skills and ELM/534 Elements of Literacy Content and Curricular Knowledge. There was valuable information in the Day 1 assignment. There are a variety of tools that will support the Teacher Candidates. The edTPA Handbook,  Understanding Academic Language Handout, Making Good Choices document, and the Understanding Rubric Level Progressions documents are excellent support guides to help supervisors clarify what edTPA is requiring. The information about the cycles of Planning, Instruction, and Assessments along with Rubric Progression levels were very valuable. I enjoyed the “edTPA Orientation for Program Leaders and Faculty,” video which described edTPA as an assessment of teacher candidates’ abilities to plan, teach, and assess in the classroom. The goal of edTPA is to make sure that new teachers can improve the learning for every student It was interesting to know that more than 600 teacher preparation programs in 40 states are using edTPA. I have been engaged in edTPA for the last three years so I understood the information about the acceptable and unacceptable forms of support. It is always beneficial to review this information. Students do struggle with the Central Focus and Academic Language. The examples and information about both of these components was helpful.  

sharontucker's picture sharontucker | October 22, 2019 6:56 pm MST

Hello, Donna! Are you the online instructor from Nashville, TN? This is Sharon Tucker, and I am in this workshop as faculty Supervisor of Student Teachers. 

dlange1's picture dlange1 | October 23, 2019 2:26 pm MST

Hi Sharon! Great to hear from you! I am still an online instructor and Supervising Teacher Candidates, too! I miss all of us being at the Nashville campus! I wish the University of Phoenix would return to Nashville!

dlange1's picture dlange1 | October 23, 2019 2:27 pm MST

Hi Sharon! Great to hear from you! I am still an online instructor and Supervising Teacher Candidates, too! I miss all of us being at the Nashville campus! I wish the University of Phoenix would return to Nashville!

Donna Bullock's picture Donna Bullock | October 23, 2019 8:08 pm MST

Welcome Donna!

 

Let me know if you ever have any question e ven after the workshop.

 

Donna

Mary Jane Hill's picture Mary Jane Hill | October 22, 2019 4:18 pm MST

Hi Everyon!

My name is MJ Hill and I teach ELL500 and SEI500 and sometimes the MTE541 class.  I also teach in other programs that certify teachers with TESOL certifications and keep a hand in ESL classes to apply my knowledge.  I have supervised student teachers with a number of universities and got my start as an elementary education teacher.  I go in and out of the classroom for various jobs.  I worked with CalTPA with another university and went through the training.  I have attended meetings with the EDTPA presenters and the parameters are quite similar, it seems.  I have worked with students and know what I can and cannot do to help them with their assessments, which happen during student teaching.  I look forward to our class!

Donna Bullock's picture Donna Bullock | October 23, 2019 8:10 pm MST

Welcome Mary Jane.

 

CalTPA and edTPA have some similiar components (I have been told).  Let me know if you have any questions as you learn more about edTPA.

 

Donna

sblong55's picture sblong55 | October 22, 2019 4:29 pm MST

Hello!  I am Dr. Shannon Long and I am excited to be a part of this workshop.  I currently teach (COM/520) Organizational Communication. As a veteran educator, I am completing various trainings to transition to teaching courses in the College of Education. I have been in education for twenty seven years.  Currently, I am a middle school administrator, but have experience with all levels.  One of the most gratifying responsibilites of my position is completing teacher evaluations and working with new teachers in my district.  I have really enjoyed learning about the edTPA process. The summary assessment will prepare teachers to be learner ready. The foundation is reflection of their own readiness. As a new teacher, it is imperative to be able to look at your skills and make adjustments to best serve all of your diverse learners. I really like the use of video to assess their teaching and impact on students. InTASC standards and state standards are followed which better prepare teachers for their specific teaching area. The rubrics also focus on areas of opportunity for new teachers. As a faculty member, I believe that the materials (edTPA handbook, Rubric level progression documents) will offer guidance for us to best communicate with educators.

Donna Bullock's picture Donna Bullock | October 23, 2019 8:12 pm MST

Welcome Dr. Long!

 

I agree that videos to assess teaching is powerful!  I have done that for myself.

 

Let me know if you have any questions.

 

Donna

Jamie Barnes's picture Jamie Barnes | October 22, 2019 6:33 pm MST

Hello! My name is Jamie Barnes and I facilitate SEI (Structured English Immersion) coursework. Some of these courses are at the undergraduate level while others are at the graduate level. Learning more about edTPA and how to support students with using the associated tools which are now integrated into my courses has been constructive and thought-provoking. The materials provided today have helped me begin to understand more about edTPA, how it has come to be more widely used, and the various requirements associated with the assessment. I did not realize how many different variations there are for edTPA, including multiple sets of guidelines and scoring criteria. The different rubrics are interesting to me and align well with what I have experienced during recent years with evaluation for educators in the school system. The edTPA Guidelines for Acceptable Candidate Support and Understanding Rubric Level Progressions are both documents that I will be able to use for reference regularly. Developing an understanding of edTPA, its components, and how to support students has been a worhtwhile experience overall.

Donna Bullock's picture Donna Bullock | October 23, 2019 8:13 pm MST

Thanks James.

 

Welcome to this workshop and let me know if you have any questions.

 

Donna

Milinda Jaffe-Bork's picture Milinda Jaffe-Bork | October 22, 2019 7:21 pm MST

Hi, I am Milinda Jaffe, and I am both an online facilitator for University of Phoenix and a middle school art teacher. I am currently a faculty supervisor for a student who is becoming an art teacher. I teach grades 6-8, and I teach several arts methodology classes for UofP. I know that the edTPA is a performance based assessment that was created by teachers for teacher candidates. It is student-centered and offers students the ability to reflect on their teaching practices. Students submit artifacts and evidence of their teaching for three tasks: planning, instruction, and assessment. The edTPA answers the question, " is the new teacher ready for the job?" I know that each edTPA has TPE's, or performance expectations, by which the student is measured on a rubric. The rubric goes from developing to exemplary, and the student is supposed to be scored with the understanding that they are a beginning teacher.

Donna Bullock's picture Donna Bullock | October 23, 2019 8:15 pm MST

Hi Milinda,

 

Welcome to the workshop.  I hope you learn a lot to take with you as an online facilitator for UOPX.

 

Donna

18bltuthill's picture 18bltuthill | October 23, 2019 3:23 am MST

Hi All, I am jumping in a bit late.  I got my start as an Elementary teacher, but I have taught middle school and high school. Currently, I teach GEN 201, English and critical thinking courses.  I have been an instructor with UOP for 10 years. I have only been a supervisor for student teachers once, but I really enjoyed the experience and think that I learned as much as the student did.  I am excited to learn about the new guidelines for the state of TN and am impressed with the rubrics.  I also  teach at my local community college and the information I gain here can enhance my knowledge for that position also.  I look forward to learning and growing with all of you. Becky 

Donna Bullock's picture Donna Bullock | October 23, 2019 8:16 pm MST

Hi Becky and welcome.

 

edTPA is fairly new to TN.  This new knowledge can really be beneficial for you and your students.

 

Donna

18bltuthill's picture 18bltuthill | October 24, 2019 4:14 pm MST

Thanks Donna, I am not sure I found the TN Handbook. Do you happen to have a direct link? 

18bltuthill's picture 18bltuthill | October 24, 2019 4:14 pm MST

Thanks Donna, I am not sure I found the TN Handbook. Do you happen to have a direct link? 

mrmlanderson's picture mrmlanderson | October 23, 2019 3:37 pm MST

Hi all,

I am Mike Anderson and I facilitate MAED courses.

I have been involved in the TPA process with some of my staff the last couple of years.

I am looking forward to learning about any changes in the programs.

Mike

Donna Bullock's picture Donna Bullock | October 23, 2019 8:24 pm MST

Welcome Mike!

 

I am pleased you were able to be here.  Let me know if you have any questions.

 

Donna

David E. Proudfoot's picture David E. Proudfoot | October 22, 2019 8:17 am MST

Day 2:

1. Discuss the deconstructing questions and guiding questions you created for your assignment.

What other guiding questions and/or feedback could you give to your students based on appropriate guidelines for feedback?

dlange1's picture dlange1 | October 23, 2019 2:43 pm MST

Hi David-I cannot log into the website to watch the video,"Deconstructing the Standards Into Specific and Measurable Learning Targets".

I keep receiving this message. “Ooops, your account was not found, please try again Please log-in to the 360° Leadership Assessment System.”

Any suggestions?

https://www.educationalimpact.com/programs/programs/activity/mcm_01c_04/

18bltuthill's picture 18bltuthill | October 23, 2019 5:59 pm MST

David, you are not alone. I can not login either. Thanks for asking about this! Becky 

Donna Bullock's picture Donna Bullock | October 23, 2019 8:34 pm MST

Hi,

 

I looked for another resource and here is an article that covers the same information.  I hope this helps.

 

Donna

dlange1's picture dlange1 | October 24, 2019 7:30 pm MST

Thanks, Donna!!!

dlange1's picture dlange1 | October 24, 2019 7:30 pm MST

Thanks, Donna!!!

dlange1's picture dlange1 | October 24, 2019 7:30 pm MST

Thanks, Donna!!!

mrmlanderson's picture mrmlanderson | October 23, 2019 3:34 pm MST
Hello,
 
I am Mike Anderson. 
 
I have been with UOP for about 10 years.  I am currently teaching ADMIN528.  
 
I have really enjoyed my classes, because I am learning as much as the students!  
 
There are some terrific leaders going through our programs.

 

I have have helped some of my staff with California TPA curriculum the last few years.  I am glad to have this training due to the changes recently adopted this year.  
 
While I do not have additional questions at this time, I'm sure they will come soon.
 
The guidelines provided in the resources and with my experences to date, I feel I can coach them through the process and give the additonal resources.
 
Thank you,
 
Mike
amcnall's picture amcnall | October 23, 2019 5:37 pm MST

I need support in assessing the resources for day 2.  I am having issues logging it to view the view.  

amcnall's picture amcnall | October 24, 2019 7:31 pm MST

Yes thank you!

sblong55's picture sblong55 | October 23, 2019 5:50 pm MST

The day 2 training gave me an opportunity to dive into the key concepts of each rubric.  It gave me a chance to get to know the rubric questions much better.  I feel as though it is important for me to have a clear understanding of the expectations of the edTPA so that I can better support candidates. Focusing on the rubric allows candidates to become familiar with what is required to create a level 5 TPA. I will be able to support candidates with locating support documents, guiding discussions in regards to the rubrics, and referring students to the writing center for writing assistance. Through self-reflection and the support through these resources, candidates will learn how to be sure they are including all components expected to be addressed under each concept in the rubric. Explaining scoring rubrics, and helping candidates develop timelines to submission are also other ways I can provide support.

18bltuthill's picture 18bltuthill | October 23, 2019 6:08 pm MST

Rubrics are my go to for all assignments. I always provide them to students ahead of time and explain each concept or task on the rubric in detail. Asking questions that pertain to each rubric was a great exercise to help me become familiar with the expectations for the student.  If I can help the student develop strong answers to these questions they will find more success in this learning process.  Providing a rubric and asking questions can ease the student’s confusion or worry about the process or assignment. If a student understands the requirements they will have a much higher rate of success. I would also ask the student some further questions about theory or research and how to find appropriate and credible research. I might also encourage them to explore the resources available to help them succeed.  I could have conversations with the student on what strategies they feel might work and what might not work and why. 

 

Jamie Barnes's picture Jamie Barnes | October 23, 2019 6:31 pm MST

Good evening! The processes of reviewing the documents for today and developing guiding questions for the higher peformance indicators of the rubric was another valuable learning experience. What struck me the most about these rubrics and questions was how well they align with the expectations for teacher evaluation in my home state of Tennessee. This process is better aligned with the requirements for classroom teachers than previous pre-service teacher evaluation models that I have reviewed. The guidling questions developed from the performance indicators could be used as a helpful prompt for anybody completing the process to submit an edTPA assessment. They would have been helpful for me to have on hand when I have served in the role of faculty supervisor for UOP and cooperating teacher for a student teacher in my classroom. I will definitely save them for future use.

My only question/concern relates to Rubrics 16-18. I could not locate these rubrics anywhere and hope that I didn't miss something. Did anybody else run into the same issue? Did I miss a resource somehow?

Donna Bullock's picture Donna Bullock | October 23, 2019 8:44 pm MST

James,

 

The rubrics 16-18 are for Elementary Education Mathematics Task 4.  This Task is only in elementary education.  If you are looking at another handbook, you won't have these rubrics.   I hope that helps.

 

Donna

sharontucker's picture sharontucker | October 23, 2019 6:46 pm MST

I, too, had difficulty logging in to the video. However, I was able to complete the individual assignment by using the downloaded handbook. There were only 15 rubrics for Elementary Education Mathematics, not 18 as the assignment asked. I did find the exercise to be very helpful. Once I translated each level five rubric into a question, I was amazed at how it changed my perspective as a supervisor and how much it will help in assisting the candidate to look at the rubrics in a different perspective. I have always used rubrics for student grading in classes that I taught. I was very excited when UOP began using rubrics in designated assignments then moving to rubrics for all colleges.

Sharon

dlange1's picture dlange1 | October 23, 2019 7:16 pm MST

The process of “unpacking standards” is very helpful at the end of the year when we receive assessment data. We can quickly and easily look at the data, identify skills students have and have not mastered, then go directly back into the curriculum and determine how often each standard was taught, when it was taught, and exactly how students interacted with the standards each time they were taught. Once teachers unpack standards, teacher can create more friendly learning objectives. “Unpacking the standards” helps identify the Power Standards. Power Standards are the most essential standards for students to master and prepare students for the next grade level. Teachers design their lessons to teach the skills and knowledge that students need to master the priority standards. Students are graded through assessments of their skills in each Power Standard.

dlange1's picture dlange1 | October 23, 2019 7:16 pm MST

The process of “unpacking standards” is very helpful at the end of the year when we receive assessment data. We can quickly and easily look at the data, identify skills students have and have not mastered, then go directly back into the curriculum and determine how often each standard was taught, when it was taught, and exactly how students interacted with the standards each time they were taught. Once teachers unpack standards, teacher can create more friendly learning objectives. “Unpacking the standards” helps identify the Power Standards. Power Standards are the most essential standards for students to master and prepare students for the next grade level. Teachers design their lessons to teach the skills and knowledge that students need to master the priority standards. Students are graded through assessments of their skills in each Power Standard.

Milinda Jaffe-Bork's picture Milinda Jaffe-Bork | October 23, 2019 8:50 pm MST

Hello,

I found it very valuable to read through the rubrics and create the guiding questions. I like that many of the rubrics focused on establishing a deep rapport with students to enable them to make connections and evaluate their own learning. I would focus on these types of questions and ask my students to focus on rapport so they can engage the students and deepen their knowledge of not only the content, but also of their own learning. I, too, was not able to find any rubrics after #15. Did I miss something? Thank you.

David E. Proudfoot's picture David E. Proudfoot | October 22, 2019 8:17 am MST

Day 3:

1. Discuss the assignment with your team.  
  • Share each of the elements that you came up with.  Give one another feedback and ideas.
2. Discuss the deconstructing questions and guiding questions you created for your assignment.  
  • What other guiding questions and/or feedback could you give to your students based on appropriate guidelines for feedback?
18bltuthill's picture 18bltuthill | October 24, 2019 4:35 pm MST

I supervise elementary and middle school teachers so I decided to go with the elementary level handbook.  However, I teach at the college level so it was difficult for me to break this down to one central focus. I created a lesson based on summary and sequencing the events of a story. The student should be able to retell the story with a focus on the plot.  The student will retell the story verbally and organize the events of the story.  Several strategies like reading aloud, foldable and vocabulary notebooks, charts and modeling would be used.  The auditory, visual and kinesthetic learning styles would be addressed along with appropriate modifications and accommodations for individual and group learners.  A review of the story summary will be conducted as closure and an assessment will take place by giving the student another story to summarize and put in sequential order.  I would also use the Socratic question method to gain an assessment of student learning.  Deconstructing the standards makes it easier to clearly define and assess student learning outcomes.  It also makes it the scaffolding of lessons easier to see and complete.  Students will need a lot of support to complete these tasks along with all of their other duties as students and student teachers.  I can see that being able to break it down into smaller and concise steps will help the student succeed.  I am still not 100% sure I did this assignment correctly. Any comments or suggestions?

 

 

Jamie Barnes's picture Jamie Barnes | October 24, 2019 4:45 pm MST

Again, I felt like the work that we went through today is aligned well with expectations for classroom teachers. My content area is secondary ELA and I've had student teachers in this context, so I used these guidelines even thought I've served as a faculty supervisor in elementary ed and facilitate SEI/ELL online. The elements that I came up with today were aligned with my current teaching practice in the classroom and these activities really allowed me to break it all down into the different components of instruction. I'm hoping that my interpretation was correct because I was doing some mental juggling with all of the resources we reviewed today.

In regard to guiding questions and feedback for students, I feel like I have a better grasp on the edTPA requirements and can prompt them accordingly. This is similar to methods that I have used in the past, and I found this framework to be helpful to build upon the elements of lesson planning. In my mind, the submission for edTPA strikes me as a mini-unit with detailed components and reflective elements following instruction. This workshop has helped me to understand the components far better so that I could help to guide a pre-service teacher through the process of accomplishing all of these goals.

sharontucker's picture sharontucker | October 24, 2019 7:35 pm MST

I am a supervisor of elementary and secondary student teacher candidates. This semester I am supervising a middle school mathematics candidate, so I chose the elementary mathematics edTPA Handbook. Because I observe varied grade levels and varied content areas, I used a variety of lesson examples for the terms in the math curriculum. The one that I want to share is also one that my student teacher uses as a closure for her 6th grade math class. The closure lesson is to ask students to write their name, what they learned in the math lesson, and any lingering questions on a blank card or “ticket” called an exit ticket. Before they leave class, the students are directed to deposit their tickets in a bin labeled either “Got It,” “More Practice, Please,” or “I Need Some Help!”—whichever best represents their understanding of the day’s content. Another lesson example is for the essential literacy strategy. I have not actually seen this lesson in a math class, but I have seen the journal technique used in several English classes. An example is writing journal entries about math puzzles and problems. The main point of journals is to encourage students to reflect on, represent, and explain their thinking; and to promote positive attitudes and dispositions toward mathematics.

 

amcnall's picture amcnall | October 22, 2019 4:26 pm MST
Hello, I am Angie McNally.  I have been with UOP for about 12 years (I think).  I am currently teaching SEC 598 and SEC 599 which are student teaching course part A and part B.  I love these classes, because the students are so excited about teaching!  I love coming home from school and seeing their posts full of energy and excitment for the profession!  It is wonderful to have these future teachers so excited for their students!
 
I have taught one edTPA direct study course a few months ago.  I am excited to have this training.  There were several things that were the same but there were many elements that were new.  I did have many questions since it was new and this training will answer those questions.

 

Donna Bullock's picture Donna Bullock | October 23, 2019 8:47 pm MST

Hi Angie,

 

I agree that  teaching seminar courses is so refreshing!  They are so excited and full of passion for teaching.  It is great!

 

If you ever have any questions about edTPA, do not hesitate to contact me.

 

Donna

sharontucker's picture sharontucker | October 22, 2019 6:58 pm MST

Good evening! I am Sharon Tucker and I have been LFAC of psychology for 8 years at the Nashville, TN on ground UOP campus. I have also taught various communications and humanities classes. Currently, I am Faculty Supervisor for student teachers in Tennessee and have been in this position for three years. I do appreciate all the materials made available during this edTPA Training. I also was on the Meet and Greet live session this evening. I found the PP presentation to be very informative, and it was very helpful in clarifying the materials that student teachers are required to provide in the edTPA portion of the teacher training. I have a TN teaching certification for K-12, and I have supervised student teachers in elementary and high school settings.

Donna Bullock's picture Donna Bullock | October 23, 2019 8:48 pm MST

Thanks for being here Sharon.

 

Let me know if you have any questions with edTPA and your new knowleldge.

 

Donna

Mary Jane Hill's picture Mary Jane Hill | October 24, 2019 11:49 am MST

Ed TPA Rubrics

 

The training and support information for the EdTPA is quite in-depth and user-friendly!  I am impressed with the materials, since I am comparing them to a previous TPA Assessment training I attended years ago with another organization.  The handbook is highly accessible material for the students as well.  I see that the interface support that we are going through here is grounds and contextualizes the vast body of knowledge that the EdTPA brings forward, for both student and facilitator.  Focusing on the 4 and 5 level rubric transition maintains the high expectations.  Since I have worked with the TPAs and several of the previous teacher candidate assessments, I am grounded in the framework of expectations.  For a student just learning this process, I can see that a series of orientations, from an overview to a part by part analysis, starting at the beginning of the program, would help to familiarize the assessment concept.  I think that multiple visits to the handbook and material is the key to embracing this expectation for students.  I know the philosophy is not to introduce heavy concepts at the beginning of the class schedule, but knowing how the entire educational program is interconnected helps students to grasp the assessment concepts in a more practical approach.  Seeing the supplemental materials as a facilitator and exploring best practices to help students is a positive approach to learning to coach our teacher candidates.

Milinda Jaffe-Bork's picture Milinda Jaffe-Bork | October 24, 2019 9:01 pm MST

Hi Everyone,

As I am an art teacher and have a student teacher for fine art, I used the handbook for Visual Art. I don't remember the exact examples that I gave, but I can list a few. For central focus, that would be the project that the student is supposed to learn; such as how to use line to show motion. An essential literacy strategy would be to use a word wall to teach art vocabulary. A language function would be using language to describe the elements of a work of art, while academic language is oral and written language used for academic purposes. An examples of using academic language might be having the students write a critique of a work of art. An instructional strategy that I included was using modeling to show students how to create a work of art. A differentiation strategy would be providing special tools or handouts for special education students. Using an exit ticket for students to show their understanding would be an example of closure, while using a rubric to assess a work of art would be an example of assessment. The feedback that I would give to my student teacher would be to encourage his students to make connections back to themselves and their communities when creating and viewing a work of art.

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