Zoo-phonics' Effect on Rate of Improvement and Risk Indicators: A Quasi-experimental Study

Zoo-phonics' Effect on Rate of Improvement and Risk Indicators: A Quasi-experimental Study

Author: 
Shabie H. Anouar
Program of study: 
Ed.D./CI
Abstract: 
This quasi experimental quantitative study sought to determine if Zoo-phonics had a statistically significant effect on AIMSweb Rate of Improvement scores and Risk Indicator scores for students who were exposed and were not exposed to the Zoo-phonics Multi-sensory Language Arts Program in a Head Start setting. The study took place on a Native American Reservation in rural Idaho, and involved approximately 213 kindergarten students who were previously enrolled in the tribal Head Start program. A t-test and Chi-Square analysis were performed to determine a statistically significant difference amongst the winter 2010 and spring 2012 AIMSweb Rate of Improvement scores and Risk Indicator scores. Results indicate there was no effect on AIMSweb Rate of Improvement scores amongst comparison groups from the Kindergarten classes in the area of Letter Sound Fluency and Risk Indicators for reading. However, there was a statistically significant difference between comparison groups in the area of Letter Naming Fluency, favoring the non exposed group. Hence Zoo-phonics did not effect the exposed group for the Letter Naming Fluency subtest. Comparison of the study participants to national norms revealed normatively higher weekly growth. However the exposed Zoo-phonics group only experienced marginal weekly growth. Several limitations in the standardized implementation of the Zoo-phonics program were noted as potentially contributing to the lack of growth. Recommendations include more professional staff development on the Zoo-phonics Program in order to increase outcomes in AIMSweb ROI scores and Risk Indicators for reading. Adherence to the Zoo-phonics curriculum as published is also recommended for an increase in outcomes, along with increased collaboration between Head Start and kindergarten teachers.
Dedication: 
This study is dedicated to the tribe and its Early Childhood Educators. Thank you for embracing me, welcoming me into your community and allowing me to complete this study for your benefit. I am truly and graciously in your debt. “I wish all my children would learn more and more every day, so they can mingle with the white people and do business with them as well as anybody else.” ~Chief Joseph, 1904
Acknowledgements: 
First, I would like to thank the “Creator” for your grace, mercy and answered prayers. To my mother Carrie W. Herndon and father Charles E. Herndon Jr. thank you for allowing me to follow my dreams. My brother De-Wayne R. Herndon, thanks for telling me not to give up. To my grandparents: Curtis L. Walton, Barbara P. Walton (deceased); Charles E. Herndon Sr. and Ernestine W. Herndon I thank you for always supporting my dreams and for encouraging me to get an education. I listened well! To my uncle: Dr. Michael K. Herndon, you are my inspiration and my hero! I love you. To Aunt “Holly”, thanks for being my “cheerleader.” To my committee: Dr. K, thanks for taking me on when I was at my lowest point. Dr. Wrighton, thank you for encouraging me to keep pushing even when I didn’t think I could. Dr. Lehrman, thank you for staying with me through this journey! You are the only original committee member. Dena Jones, thanks for providing me access to the data. To my beautiful friends: Stephen A. Marion, where would I be without you? I don’t even want to know. Thanks for your undying support. Kanika DeSandies, you have been a true blue and I thank you! Michelle J. Bailey, my sister from another mister! Dr. D’Lisa Pinkham, thank you for your encouragement and yes, it’s finally my turn! Dr. David Aiken, thank you for your encouragement and commiseration. Mrs. Verna Johnson, you are a light, let it shine! Thank you for your prayer and genuine wish for me to succeed. Finally, to my husband Bouchaib thank you for letting me cry when I needed to. I love you all!