Trilogy of African American Success in Bachelor of Science Nursing: A Constructivist Grounded Study

Trilogy of African American Success in Bachelor of Science Nursing: A Constructivist Grounded Study

Author: 
Anne Marie Jean-Baptiste
Program of study: 
Ph.D./NUR
Abstract: 
African Americans students have been underrepresented in baccalaureate science nursing (BSN) programs. The increase in cultural and racial diversity in United States has contributed to health disparities. The primary purpose of this constructivist grounded theory study was to identify a theory encompassing aspects specific to African American BSN students regarding recruitment and retention. The secondary purpose was to explore the processes that African American graduates of BSN programs experienced during recruitment and retention. All 14 participants were African American, were born and raised in United States, and had graduated within the last 11 years from a BSN program in the mid-Atlantic region. Constant comparative approach and theoretical sampling were used as primary data analysis methods. Data saturation was reached after 14 interviews. The theory that emerged from the data was a trilogy of African American success in BSN. This theory described how African American students relied on their inner skills and dispositions as they redefined the learning context and embraced external support systems for successful recruitment and retention in a BSN program. The study findings revealed the need for innovative strategies to recruit and retain African American students in BSN programs. The success of African American BSN students may lead to their increased representation to balance the healthcare workforce and the reduction of heath care disparities among African Americans.
Dedication: 
I dedicate this study to my daughter, Johannie Jacquitte. May you opt for the path of lifelong learning that is very rewarding. To my brothers Mayard and Henri JeanBaptiste who have always believed that I can do better. I can hear my deceased brother Walner Jean-Baptiste reminding me how much he is counting on me to do good work. During my journey, there are days when I am convinced of the presence of the spirits of my deceased parents Mayotte and Preval Jean-Baptiste cheering me up. Of course, to God, through the Holy Spirit, I owe divine guidance under which I have completed the course. I am also grateful for my colleagues, Professor Elmira Asongwed, Dr. Elgloria Harrison, and the director of nursing, Dr. Pier Broadnax, who are constantly encouraging me and allowing me the time needed to complete this work
Acknowledgements: 
I would like to seize this moment to acknowledge my dissertation chair, Dr. Anne Brett, who has been patient, friendly, and affable, yet who accepts nothing else but excellence. Her guidance is indispensable in this journey. I thank committee members Dr. Nita Magee-Cornelius and Dr. Judith Treschuk who have responded to my calls and have shared their expertise to assist me in reaching my intended goal. A special acknowledgment goes to the participants who have given their time, essentially to render this study possible. Thank you to all my friends, coworkers, and family members who have directly or indirectly contributed to this journey.