Transformational Leadership Style and Communication on Organizational Performance: A Qualitative Grounded Theory Study

Transformational Leadership Style and Communication on Organizational Performance: A Qualitative Grounded Theory Study

Author: 
Darcia Ann-Marie Roache
Program of study: 
D.B.A.
Abstract: 
The current qualitative study used a grounded theory based on interview using standard set of questions about transformational leadership style and communication on organizational effectiveness and employees’ performance. The study sample was 30 participants from business organizations, institutions, churches, financial institutions, government, and non-governmental agencies in the parishes of Manchester, Clarendon, and St. Elizabeth, Jamaica West Indies. The study used NVivo 10 qualitative analysis software to assist in the development codes, categories, and themes from the interviews, using data obtained and analysed from the constant comparison method. The results added to the body of knowledge by providing fundamental values and skills such as employee motivation and effective communication needed for leaders and aspirant leaders to craft executive strategies for themselves and their organizations. The research also added to the body of knowledge by revealing that when leaders effectively communicate with employees, mutual understanding of the organization’s goals and objectives can create initiatives for organizational success. The results indicated that for leaders to achieve transformational leadership style their organizational operations should focus on these areas or concerns: (a) employees’ motivation; (b) culture and structure of organizational; (c) emotional intelligence; (d) barriers to communication; (c) effective communication methods; (e) leadership style; (f) information technology; (g) organizational effectiveness and efficiency; and (h) employee empowerment. The findings supported that effectiveness in the areas of importance or concern defined the fundamental relationship dynamics that organizations, leaders, and employees need to sustain a successful organization in the global economy of the 21st century.
Dedication: 
I dedicate this dissertation to Jesus Christ for his love, mercy, and guidance. To my former manager Mr. Alfred Graham for his constant encouragement and support, and to the many people who are academically ambitious and bewildered by the facets of the dissertation process. This process was a true lesson for me. I was tested in all the possible areas of life, but thanks be to God for keeping me sober, until now. To Him be glory, honor, and praise now, and forever more.
Acknowledgements: 
Several individuals have provided support during this dissertation process. My mentor, Dr. Oliver Lawrence has been an excellent coach and guide who shares in my success. He is so dedicated and committed, and I could always depend on his timely feedback. He provided me with valuable insight, yet allowed me to challenge my critical thinking skills and lift my level of writing. To my committee members, Dr. Jeff Bruns, and Dr. Santosh Sambare thank you is inadequate to say. Your constructive criticism did it for me. Thanks to Alfred Graham, my former manager for his constant encouragements to finish this study, especially when the going became unbearable. He told me he would stop being my friend I had discontinued the course. To my family members, “Thank you.” Thanks to my mother and father who instill in me the value of education, and to Pastor Austin Cawley for his encouragements. Thanks to Dr. Diane Dusick and her team from Bold Educational Software for assisting with the American Psychological Association (APA) issues, the data analysis issues, and grammatical errors. Thanks to the University of Phoenix online doctoral program, especially the review boards ARB and IRB, and the Dean’s Office for their assistance in maintaining high standards in scholarly writings. Thanks to my academic counselors, financial advisors, and the facilitators of the doctoral program for the knowledge I have gained academically. Special thanks to Dr. Thompson, from MacEwan University in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, his assistance and time in the entire process was so impeccable. The pressure was too much for me to bear, thanks be to God for him, and his invaluable contribution.