Teachers Perception of Kindergarten Play in Video Games with Badges: A Delphi Study

Teachers Perception of Kindergarten Play in Video Games with Badges: A Delphi Study

Author: 
Heather Long
Program of study: 
Ed.D./ET
Abstract: 
Educators, administrators, and researchers continue to search for a solution to return play to kindergarten classrooms while encouraging the use of technology to meet federal education standards. A review of the literature showed a gap in strategies for implementing play, findings were lacking on video games with digital badges in education, and how games can best be used for learning. The general problem is kindergarten play is being replaced by new academic and technology standards. The specific problem is the rise of technology and technology standards warrant the need to explore educator perceptions of kindergarten play in video games with digital badges. Educators determine what is taught in the classroom; everything from coloring to letters and numbers. The purpose of this qualitative Delphi study was to explore and identify nine, United States, educator’s perceptions of kindergarten play in video games with digital badges. Nine expert panelists participated in a three-round Delphi study, including an open-ended questionnaire and two rounds of Likert survey questionnaires with commented feedback. The panelists’ feedback using descriptive data analysis, were grouped in the following categories: means to leverage, concerns with use, and overall perceptions. The critical concern identified was time-limits and the need to have time-limits and structure in place. The panelists agreed video games with digital badges can be leveraged as differentiated practice and motivation as well as dramatic play activities, library learning, or as part of a rotation center. The perceptions were kindergarten play in video games with digital badges is positive, engaging, and a motivating way to work on and master skills. The results of this study were an exploration and identification of teacher perceptions of kindergarten play in video games with digital badges.
Dedication: 
This dissertation is dedicated to my family. My son, Sean, and my daughter, Isabelle, have supported my journey throughout the process and through to the end. You made me laugh when it felt as though the days would not end. You are proud of my accomplishments and without you I would not have completed this journey. I love you and will always be proud to be your mom. My husband, Gregory Long, you have contributed to my sanity on some days and drove me crazy on others. To my parents, Mark and Eloise Fioravanti, thank you for teaching me and encouraging me to accomplish my dreams. Dad, you’ve always taught me I can do anything I put my mind to. Thanks for all the delicious dinners and Papa adventures with the kids while I worked on writing. To my grandparents, Georgia Fioravanti and Bill Reidel, thank you for your love and kindness. My grandfather Edis Fioravanti and my great-grand parents Marjorie Root, Edis and Julie Fioravanti would be proud. You taught me many things. My friends and family who have been there throughout and new friends I met along my journey. I appreciate the sanity checks, the laughs, the coffee, and the countless hours of love, discussion, and support. “Becki Bob” you rock, you are my sister from another mister. Here’s to our many late night chats and sanity checks for each other. Thank you.
Acknowledgements: 
Many people contributed to the success of my dissertation process. The nine educator participants, I acknowledge and thank you for your expert contributions and feedback throughout the study. Without your participation, I would not have completed my study. To my dissertation chair, Dr. Shannon Hilliker, I appreciate your feedback, expertise, encouragement, and support throughout the dissertation process. I have learned so much from you, Dr. Hilliker. I truly appreciate everything, thank you. The journey has been amazing and filled with learning and adventure. I could not have made this journey without you as my chair. I will always remember to write with questions. To my committee members, Dr. Sean Preston and Dr. Judy Alston, I thank you for your reviews, your encouragement, and feedback. Dr. Preston, I enjoyed learning about your doctoral journey and learning from you.