Supervisor Communication in Virtual Teams: A Correlational Study of Emotional Intelligence, Trustworthiness, and Self-confidence

Supervisor Communication in Virtual Teams: A Correlational Study of Emotional Intelligence, Trustworthiness, and Self-confidence

Author: 
Detra A. German
Program of study: 
D.B.A.
Abstract: 
Virtual organizations often fail to achieve objectives due to supervisors’ ineffective communication in a virtual workplace. Effective communication is a necessity for successful virtual teams. The purpose of this quantitative non-experimental, correlational study was to examine the relationships between an employee’s perception of his or her supervisor’s key attributes and supervisor communication in virtual teams. The focus of the study was to examine the extent to which virtual employee perceptions of a supervisor’s emotional intelligence, trustworthiness, and self-confidence correlated with supervisor communication. This study included a sample of 107 adult virtual employees residing in the United States. The results revealed a supervisor’s emotional intelligence, trustworthiness, and self-confidence positively correlated with virtual supervisor communication. The results of the study indicated leaders of virtual organizations should consider using interactive communication tools (e.g., live video conferencing, screen sharing) that provide virtual employees and supervisors with opportunities to build positive relationships. The results of the current study also indicate hiring and promoting virtual supervisors who display emotional intelligence, trustworthiness, and self-confidence may contribute to a positive flow of information communication with employees.
Dedication: 
To my father who told me to keep my hands in God’s hands and keep moving forward; To my mother who taught me how to sing praises to God while pushing my way through; To my siblings, family, and friends who gave endless love, support, and patience; To my colleagues, coworkers, and mentors who pushed me to “Get it done”; To everyone who prayed me through. “Being confident of this very thing, that he which hath begun a good work in you will perform it until the day of Jesus Christ:” Philippians 1:6, KJV
Acknowledgements: 
I thank God for giving me the strength to endure this doctoral journey through to the end. I also thank God for putting all the right individuals in my path to help me along the way. Many thanks to Dr. John Sienrukos, mentor and chair of my committee, for his sincerity in seeing this project through to completion. Dr. Sienrukos was committed to my doctoral journey from the very first day he joined the committee. I thank Dr. Sienrukos for letting me benefit from all of his experience and wisdom. Thanks also to my committee members, Dr. Ruby Daniels and Dr. Richard Schuttler. There are no words that can express my thanks to Dr. Daniels for her dedication and infinite knowledge. Dr. Daniels was my personal cheerleader and helped me to see the light at the end of the tunnel on many occasions. Dr. Schuttler offered his support and guidance immediately upon joining my committee. It was an honor to have Dr. Schuttler on my committee. Many thanks to Dr. Daniels and Dr. Schuttler for granting permission to use their copyrighted material, the Supervisor’s Leadership and Communication Inventory (SLCI) instrument. I would also like to especially thank Dr. Diane Hamilton, Dr. Robert Olding, and all faculty I worked with at the University of Phoenix.