A Study of Knowledge Worker Management and Collaboration at Science Applications International Corporation

A Study of Knowledge Worker Management and Collaboration at Science Applications International Corporation

Author: 
Michael Rodis
Program of study: 
D.M./IST
Abstract: 
The perceptions of three generations of knowledge workers (Baby Boomers, Gen X, and Gen Y) towards management collaboration in physical and virtual environments were explored in this qualitative study using an exploratory case study method. The researcher examined collaboration tools, management processes, deficiencies, and best practices used by different generations of knowledge workers. This analysis included the data collected from face-to-face interviews and surveys administered to knowledge worker senior managers, project managers, first-line supervisors, team-leads, and interns of a defense-contracting firm located in Alabama using NVivo 10® software. The results of this research could encourage other organizations and areas of industry to investigate additional collaboration concerns or suggestions, which have the potential for making organizations successful within any industry as a knowledge worker generation retires and exits the workforce, and a new generation of knowledge workers enters the workforce. The case study involved Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), a Fortune 500 Company, and a leading defense-contracting firm supporting Department of Defense (DOD) clients. The company employs generations of knowledge workers, all interacting differently within varying collaboration environments to include both physical and virtual boundaries. The exploratory case study method helped to identify how different generations of knowledge workers still employed by SAIC work in partnership to support DOD customers through different methods of collaboration.
Dedication: 
This study is dedicated to my mother, whose spirit has always encouraged me to believe in myself and challenged me to accomplish anything I choose to do. To my faithful Saint Bernard dog “Maximus,” for his dedication and loyalty in lying by my side and providing me comfort while I spent endless hours working on my dissertation.
Acknowledgements: 
I would like to thank my mentor, Dr. Stephen Northam, and my committee members, Dr. Ronald Leach and Dr. Betty Jean Jones, for their assistance throughout the dissertation process. Their scholarly insights, extremely pleasant personalities, and motivation to assist me in completing my dissertation were, without a doubt, enjoyable. I would also like to thank SAIC for allowing me to conduct my case study using the personnel within their Alabama facility as well as providing financial support as I worked on my dissertation. As a disabled veteran, I would like to thank the Veterans Administration for paying my full tuition and cost of books for the last year of my doctoral program.