Socialization During Shift Report for Newly Licensed Nurses in Critical Care

Socialization During Shift Report for Newly Licensed Nurses in Critical Care

Author: 
Sara B. Turpel
Program of study: 
Ph.D./NUR
Abstract: 
There is a concern in nursing regarding turnover of newly licensed registered nurses and the high nurse vacancy rates in critical care that are occurring in part due to the difficult transition from education to practice. Socializing to a new role is part of transitioning to practice and the ability to communicate effectively contributes to the socialization process. A common source of communication and socialization for nurses is nursing shift report. The purpose of this exploratory, single case study was to explore the socialization that occurs during shift report for newly licensed registered nurses in critical care with the goal of identifying propositions for further study. Nine newly licensed registered nurses in critical care responded to semi-structured interview questions focused on their experience with shift report. Two nurse leader participants provided contextual information. With a focus on the accommodation phase of socialization, Feldman’s contingency theory of socialization guided the study. Patterns that emerged from the data centered on: (a) being new means feeling unprepared, ill equipped, and overwhelmed with shift report, (b) digging deeper to really know the patient through shift report, (c) learning the art of communicating as a critical care nurse through reporting, (d) telling the patient story in shift report enhances understanding, (e) getting to know the experienced nurses, and (f) being judged during shift report hones and sharpens a critical care nurse. The patterns led to propositions and recommendations for further study examining the relationship between shift report and novice nurse socialization.
Dedication: 
This is dedicated to critical care nurses everywhere. I appreciate your hard work.
Acknowledgements: 
If there was an encyclopedia description of the perfect dissertation committee chair, I believe it would include a picture of Dr. Finch-Guthrie. I know that I was a challenge, but she hung in there with me and there are not enough words to express my gratitude to her. Dr. Nita Magee-Cornelius and Dr. Cydney Mullen gave their time and attention and helped guide me through this process and I appreciate them, again, more than words can say. My husband, my mother, and my sisters listened to much more from me about this process than they should ever have had to. Thank you and I love you all. If people go through this dissertation process without the support of others going through the process at the same time, I have no idea how. Donna, Lisa, and Sibi, you mean more to me than you will ever know. If not for a small group of RNs, LPNs, and nursing assistants at a rural hospital in Nebraska, I would not be where I am. They took me in as a high school student, taught me to be a nursing assistant, showed me what it means to be a nurse, and then planted the first notion in my brain that maybe I could be a nurse. After graduation, they bought me a stethoscope and bandage scissors, attached baby bracelets with my name spelled out in beads to each, and sent me off to nursing school. I hope that I have made them proud.