Secondary Mathematics Intervention and Cahsee Mathematics Performance

Secondary Mathematics Intervention and Cahsee Mathematics Performance

Author: 
Jordan B. Smith, Jr.
Program of study: 
Ed.D./CI
Abstract: 
There are too many students continuing to fail the mathematics section of the CAHSEE. The purpose of this quantitative ex post facto retrospective study was to investigate if four interventions for secondary mathematics courses contributed to an improvement in test scores on the math section of the CAHSEE. The inclusive research question was “What difference did specific math interventions have on student CAHSEE (DV) scores? The specific interventions (IV) were the sub-questions of this study. The independent variables included four secondary mathematics interventions (AVID Elective course, QSRS Technology, Double-Dose Mathematics Intervention course, and CAHSEE Mathematics Intervention course). The archival data collection used CAHSEE math scores from 671 students (329 from 2012 and 342 from 2013) from Riverside County, California. The statistical analysis used descriptive statistics to determine the effect of four interventions on student mathematics performance. This retrospective study used chi-square statistics to compare the ratios of proficient (scales score ≥ 380) to nonproficient (scale score < 380) scores between groups using an intervention and not using an intervention. The findings found the AVID Elective course (p=.001, 2012; p=.013, 2013) was an efficient intervention preparing students for the mathematics section of the CAHSEE. The findings for the Double-Dose Mathematics Intervention course (p=.229, 2012; p=.001, 2013), the QSRS Technology (p <.001, 2012; p=.231, 2013) and the CAHSEE Mathematics Intervention course (p=0.43, 2012; p< .012, 2013) found mixed results for 2012 and 2013. The results of the research study can be used and replicated to identify practical CAHSEE mathematics intervention instruction and curriculum.
Dedication: 
I dedicate this study to my wife Joyce A Smith, our children (Jordan, Jared, Gregory, John, Christina) and our grandchildren (Jonathan, Nicholas, Jordan IV, Justice, Marquites, Jasmyne, Aria, and Melina). I also would like to dedicate this work to all of the veterans of the armed forces, especially the United States Marine Corps. Semper Fi!
Acknowledgements: 
I would like to extend my appreciation to my dissertation chair Dr. Orlando Ramos for providing the guidance as a mentor and support during this doctoral journey. There were difficult times requiring modifications during the updates of the technology for this online doctoral program. It was a challenging situation, and his encouragement helped me persevere through the last two years. I thank my committee members, Dr. Libi Shen and Dr. Connie Greiner, also for their expert guidance and assistance with facilitating the dissertation process. I was blessed to have found the right committee members for my dissertation project. I also would like to thank Karina Lawrence for sharing experiences about her doctoral journey. Finally, I would like to thank Karin Lee for her insight and sharing of information to help students succeed in mathematics.