Relationships Between Attitudes Toward Technology Use, Integration, and Assessments in Elementary Classrooms

Relationships Between Attitudes Toward Technology Use, Integration, and Assessments in Elementary Classrooms

Author: 
Naomi White
Program of study: 
Ed.D./ET
Abstract: 
A quantitative study was conducted to determine how technology integration in elementary classrooms affects state mandated test scores. Survey data was collected to identify teacher attitudes toward the personal and professional use of technology and the level of technology integration into class curricula. The results were compared to state assessment data in elementary classrooms in an effort to determine the level to which technology integration affects standardized test scores. Attitudes of teachers in different age groups were examined and compared to the use and integration of technology. Technology integration levels were examined and compared to state assessment scores. A parametric test and descriptive analysis were used in this study to determine a relationship between teacher age and attitudes toward technology use and attitudes and the level of technology integration into elementary classrooms. A linear regression was used to determine the level to which technology integration affects standardized test scores. The data were compiled into graphical representations in an effort to alleviate obscurity. Participants in this study consisted of 96 elementary teachers in grade levels three, through five across 44 elementary campuses in the southern region of the United States. The data show that teachers in the 20-30 age group were more likely to access technology for personal use while teachers in all age groups used technology at some level professionally. The data also indicate that while some teachers may have a negative attitude toward using technology, teachers in all four age groups integrated technology into the curricula to some degree.
Dedication: 
This journey is dedicated to my closest friend Jennifer MacMurray, along with Betty White, Bill Bushdiecker, Stacey White, Dr. W. T. White, III, Dr. Grady S. White, Robert C. White, Esq., and Carroll Anderson, without whom this journey would not have been possible, and Mr. Jack Dinkmeyer, Sir for helping me stay grammatically correct when using the term data. This study is dedicated to the incredible educators who are always seeking the answer to “why” and who keep moving forward for the sole purpose of helping a student succeed. Lastly, this long journey and educational study are dedicated to the memory of a most amazing educator, friend, mentor, and father who gave his heart and soul to teachers, administrators, students, and his own children igniting in them a passion for learning so that they would achieve great successes; Dr. Warren Travis White, Jr.
Acknowledgements: 
I would like to express deep gratitude and appreciation to my mentor Dr. Linlin Chen for her unwavering patience, guidance, and support without whom I would still be floundering like a fish on the sidewalk. Thank you, Dr. Chen for your expertise in the subject matter and for your willingness to do whatever it took to complete this study. I would also like to thank my committee members who provided amazing feedback, input, encouragement, and support; Dr. Frances Palacio and Dr. Sally Evans. Thank you to Dr. Grady White for long discussions and providing clarity when it seemed impossible to gain and Dr. W.T. White III for continual encouragement and a listening ear. Thank you to Jennifer MacMurray who supported whatever decision I was to make in this journey and for giving up her late nights and a shoulder. Your wisdom, patience, and love helped make this dream a reality. I would also like to thank the school district and amazing educators who made it possible to conduct this study.