Relationship of Literacy to Income, Employability, and Performance: A Quantitative Analysis

Relationship of Literacy to Income, Employability, and Performance: A Quantitative Analysis

Author: 
Lawrence F. Sinclair
Program of study: 
D.M./IST
Abstract: 
Information system technology (IST) has been the powerhouse of most successful organizations. Technology has increased the complexity of job-related tasks and changed the historical context of literacy. Literacy incorporates the core mechanics of reading, writing, and numeracy with the ability to use technology to search, comprehend, and apply information to professional and personal activities. The United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) concluded that a relationship exists between literacy and socio-economic condition. One out of eight Americans is functionally illiterate, which inhibits personal growth as the country moves toward the global digital economy. The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between the independent variables (e.g., prose literacy, document literacy, and quantitative literacy) and the dependent variables (e.g., employment, job performance, and income). The survey instruments were sent to a panel of literacy experts (n = 27) in California, Florida, and New York. Inferential statistics was employed to analyze the data. Statistical tools included Spearman rho, Kendall tau b and Kolmogorov-Smirnov test of hypotheses. The study applied 0.05 levels of significant. Hypothesis (H1) showed a relationship between document literacy and employability; no significant relationship existed among prose literacy, quantitative literacy, and employability. Hypothesis (H2) revealed no relationship between the independent variables and job performance. Hypothesis (H3) showed a relationship between quantitative literacy and income; no relationship existed among prose literacy, document literacy, and income. The study demonstrated a positive relationship between document literacy and employability. A positive relationship existed between quantitative literacy and income.
Dedication: 
I dedicate this dissertation to my mother and father. This research project is a reminder to my daughter that she can achieve her aspirations through hard work and determination. I share the success of this dissertation project with my family and friends.
Acknowledgements: 
I take this opportunity to give thanks to my God and express my gratitude to my dissertation chair and committee members. Writing a dissertation is a challenging undertaking that requires resilience, strong support, and encouragement from the faculty, family, and friends. I want to acknowledge my dissertation chair, Dr. Armando Paladino for his patience and guidance. My committee members, Dr. Richard Dool, and Dr. Burke Sorenson have provided valuable feedbacks throughout the process. Also, thanks to Dr. Ali Shaykhian, one of my mentors.