The Relationship Between Part-time Online Faculty's Technological, Pedagogical, and Content Knowledge and Student Grades

The Relationship Between Part-time Online Faculty's Technological, Pedagogical, and Content Knowledge and Student Grades

Author: 
Wadad Kaaki
Program of study: 
Ph.D./HEA
Abstract: 
Current research from 2010-2016 indicates online learner grades have dropped at forprofit virtual institutions. During this same period, part-time online faculty made up for 80-90% of online faculty at for-profit virtual institutions. There is evidence of low online learner grades in an era of increased use of part-time online faculty. The purpose of this quantitative non-experimental study was to examine the relationship between seven self-reported predictor variables of part-time online faculty working at a private for-profit virtual institution and the criterion variable, online learners’ grades. A total of 81 out of 148 faculty members participated in the TPACK Survey. Multiple linear regressions and a Pearson r correlation coefficient were used to analyze data. Results of the analyses indicated the seven self-reported predictor variables of technological, pedagogical, and content knowledge of part-time online instructors did not predict online learners’ grades. Study findings imply that the domains of technological, pedagogical, and content knowledge of part-time online instructors do not account for low online learners’ grades. Close analysis of other predictor variables that may account for low online learner grades is recommended
Dedication: 
This dissertation is dedicated to my parents who I miss every day. I know they would be proud to see what became of their youngest daughter. I also dedicate this dissertation to my husband, children, and family. This dissertation is a symbol of hope, perseverance, hard work, and effort. I am the first one in my entire family to pursue higher education and I believe that this degree has helped me encourage, and empower women in my family, and it has allowed me to become a better role model to those that want to follow my lead. My sister Ferial has always been my friend and cheerleader; she has a special place in my heart forever. I will always be grateful for the unconditional love and support of those around me in my educational journey and life, thank you to all that supported me when things became almost impossible.
Acknowledgements: 
I would like to express my deepest appreciation to numerous individuals. First, I would like to thank my cohorts enrolled in the Doctorate of Philosophy in Higher Education Administration at University of Phoenix for staying in touch and checking up on me. Second, I appreciate and acknowledge my dissertation chair and committee members, Dr. Lauryl Lefebvre, Dr. Barbara Baethe, and Dr. Abdelmagead Elbiali, for their continuous feedback, support, and guidance in making this dissertation possible. My committee supported me at the most difficult stages of my dissertation journey and for that, I am blessed and honored to have worked with such a talented committee. I am forever grateful for their contributions.