The Relationship between Clinical Curriculum and First Time NCLEX-RN Success: A Correlational Study

The Relationship between Clinical Curriculum and First Time NCLEX-RN Success: A Correlational Study

Author: 
Betty M. Leslie
Program of study: 
Ph.D./NUR
Abstract: 
This quantitative correlational, descriptive study examined what relationships exist, if any, between clinical design and implementation of nursing clinical curriculum with National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN®) pass rates in Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) programs in the northeastern United States (U.S.). The population for this quantitative correlational, descriptive design included all ADN programs (N =132) located in this geographic. The sample for this study was all ADN accredited programs who willingly completed this survey (N=24). Dr. Martha Tanicala’s questionnaire was used with permission and was renamed Clinical Experiences in Associate Nursing Programs (CEANP). The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (IBM SPSS Version 21.0) was utilized to complete the descriptive and correlational statistical procedures. A point-biserial correlation revealed significant relationships between NCLEX-RN® success and the following independent variables: accreditation standards and recommendations on the design of the clinical curriculum (rpbi= .419, n = 24, p = .041, administration influence on the design of the clinical curriculum (rpbi = .415, n = 24, p = .044), and assessing clinical faculty competency (rpb= -.555, n = 24, p = .005). The findings of this study indicate that accreditation guidelines and nursing program administrators’ significantly correlate with curriculum design and NCLEX-RN® pass rates. The findings also show a significant relationship between assessment of clinical faculty competency and NCLEX-RN® success. The findings demonstrate that a more even distribution of the type of clinical hours across the curriculum may assist students with readiness for practice and first-time NCLEX-RN® achievement.
Dedication: 
I dedicate this work to God first and foremost who believes in me when I did not believe in myself. Philippians 4:13 carried me through many days. I also dedicate this work to my beautiful, talented children Keely Fay Romberger and Logan Baird Bedner who bring joy and meaning to my life. Thank you for never doubting me; your love and support pushed me forward every step of this journey. I also dedicate this to Larry Beimel who is and always will be my “oak.” I dedicate this to the memory of my family who went onto heaven: my mother, Betty Jane Leslie, my father, John Clifton Leslie, my brother, Jim Leslie, and Martha Leslie. I thank my loving second mother Chele who carried me through in prayer, tearful conversations, and unwavering faith in me. I am grateful to my brother Mark for his logical and sound advice when I doubted myself the most. I appreciate all of my brothers and sisters who have supported me: Larry, Darlene, John, Mike, Yvonne, Ralph, Colleen, Tom, Mark Daniel, and Angel (Leslie). Thank you to my dear friend Dr. Laura McDermott whose own educational journey is an inspiration to second-career nurses and U.S. veterans. I also dedicate this work to my passionate, brilliant friend Dr. Diann Martin whose belief in me made me believe in myself. Thank you to my dear friend Loretta Hayes who called me to check on me in the midst of my writing marathons. I appreciate all of my friends, family, church family, and loves ones for all of the times I could not join them when I was working on my doctoral studies. I am grateful to my loving Boston Terriers (Belle, Abbie, Miracle, Rosie, Rocky, Appa, Johnny, and Cuddles) over these years whose presence provided so much comfort.
Acknowledgements: 
This doctoral journey and culmination into a PhD Nursing was brought to fruition by God’s grace and the support of family, friends, and loved ones. Dr. Anne Brett served as my chair, providing incredible guidance and much support. My committee member, Dr. Jeanie Bachand, was so gracious to join my committee after overseeing my comprehensive exam then my doctoral residency and provided crucial feedback at key points in this journey. I thank Dr. Lenore Yates who has remained steadfast on my committee and in support of my degree. I thank Dr. John Nigris who instructed my first residency and provided advice that was useful all through this process. I appreciate my University of Phoenix colleagues who became lifelong friends.