A Quantitative Study: The Relationship Between Managers' Emotional Intelligence Awareness and Demographics and Leadership Styles

A Quantitative Study: The Relationship Between Managers' Emotional Intelligence Awareness and Demographics and Leadership Styles

Author: 
Marisela Jiménez
Program of study: 
D.M.
Abstract: 
This quantitative correlational study was conducted to examine if a possible relationship existed between managers’ emotional intelligence awareness and two leadership styles (transformational and transactional), and demographics (age, gender, and level of education). The study was completed using a population of 180 managers from a nonprofit company located in the state of Texas in the United States. The emotional intelligence construct and leadership theory were involved, representing the theoretical lens and framework in the research study. Participants’ emotional intelligence awareness was assessed with the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQi 2.0) assessment. Participants’ leadership styles were assessed with the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ 5X). Data collected was analyzed using multiple linear regression and Pearson correlational model to assess if a relationship existed between managers’ two leadership styles and the demographics. The application of multiple regression served to assess if managers’ emotional intelligence awareness predicted transformational and transactional leadership styles when controlled by the demographics from sub research questions one and two. No relationship was found between the leadership styles and the demographics. The results showed a positive relationship between emotional intelligence and the transformational leadership style; no relationship was found between the emotional intelligence construct and the transactional leadership style. The findings of this research study may be generalized to industries undergoing organizational change and may be of benefit to managers to identify and apply emotional intelligence awareness and transformational leadership style to engender organizational performance during the implementation of change initiatives.
Dedication: 
I am grateful to my Divine Creator for the strength during this rigorous journey in which much was sacrificed. This Dissertation is dedicated to my aunt Aurora Patiño who expressed her tender love, patience, and healing touch during my childhood. I am forever grateful with my parents, Tomas and Teresa Jiménez, for having reconciled and given me the opportunity to shift our family’s cycle of life that led to my pursuit of this doctoral degree. I also dedicate this Dissertation to my brother Luis and my sister Anavelia, and my nieces and nephews. I dedicate this Dissertation to my professors for sharing their knowledge and for empowering me to reach higher levels of critical thinking. This Dissertation is dedicated to all the past and present people in my life. I want to acknowledge one man who helped me, and although he is not in my life anymore, I am grateful for his contribution and leadership. Particularly, I am grateful with one leader who selflessly helped me to accomplish some of the most challenging processes of my doctoral journey and who supported me in times of great distress (Thank you, Mr. J.R. Gonzales).
Acknowledgements: 
I want to express my gratitude and acknowledge the following persons who have been incredibly supportive in helping me to accomplish my doctoral journey. I thank my mentor Dr. Lionel de Souza, and my committee members Dr. Lisa H. Cree and Dr. James Cunningham; your guidance and encouragement helped me to overcome many challenging moments, and without your patience and insight, I would had encountered many closed doors, yet you helped me to open my mind and to see opportunities amidst chaos and limitations. Thank you!