A Quantitative Study of Nursing Faculty's Personal and Professional Use of Technology

A Quantitative Study of Nursing Faculty's Personal and Professional Use of Technology

Author: 
Jamie L. Vargo-Warran
Program of study: 
D.M./IST
Abstract: 
The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to determine if there is a relationship between nursing faculty’s acceptance and intent to use technology, with the adoption of informatics in nursing education. The framework that guided this study was the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology 2. The study was guided by three research questions. Research question 1 asked the relationship between nursing faculty use of informatics in nursing education? There is significant evidence to support the claim there is a relationship between faculty’s user acceptance/behavioral intent to use technology and the adoption of informatics in nursing education. Research question 2 asked the relationship between the constructs of UTAUT2 and the behavior intent of the nursing faculty to use technology? The results support a relationship between the UTUAT2 constructs and behavioral intention to use technology thus the alternate hypothesis was supported. Research question 3 asked the relationship between age, gender, and experience of nurse faculty moderators that influence performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence, facilitating conditions, hedonic motivation, price value, and habit on personal behavior intent to use technology. The results indicated there is not significant evidence to support the claim that there is a relationship between behavioral intent to use technology and the age, gender, or experience of faculty. The results suggests that faculty’s personal and professional use of technology influences the integration of informtaics into curriculum. Recommendations for practice include incorporating an informatics champion within each school of nursing to enhance faculty members comfort with technology.
Dedication: 
I dedicate this dissertation to my parents first. Without them, none of this would by possible. They have supported my quest for knowledge despite the odds. My father, Jim Vargo, with his refusal to allow me drop out of high school, and to my mother, Bette Vargo, for giving me her one-dollar bills for spending money each week while at college. I would like to dedicate this to my children Michael Delpino and Madison Delpino next. They sacrificed their mother while learning the importance of education. I would also like to my husband, Richard Warran. Without his unconditional love, support, and understanding I would have not been able to find the necessary peace of mind needed to complete this journey. I also dedicate this to my fellow students, Luis Ramos, Vernon Louk, and Curtis Campbell, we all have struggled together and have found solace in one another. To my unsung hero which will remain nameless. Without her relentless critique, support, and knowledge base I would not be to this point. She allowed me to see my errors and understand them without guilt. Thank you to all those that have helped me make this dream a reality. From the girl who barely graduated high school to all those who wonder if you can, you can. Dare to dream!
Acknowledgements: 
I would like to acknowledge the University of Phoenix for the opportunity to study under the experts in the field. I would also like to acknowledge my chair, Dr. Kathleen Healy-Collier, for her patience and expertise while I figured out what she knew I already knew. I would also like to acknowledge my committee member, Dr. Stephanie Ferguson. She allowed me to believe in myself during my first year residency and her words will forever ring in my ear when I struggle to write. I also would like to acknowledge my committee member, Dr. Patricia Olson. Her knowledge in quantitative research and statistical analysis surpasses expertise. I will be forever grateful to these three women for their dedication, structure, expertise, patience, and most of all, guidance.