A Quantitative Study of Improvement Program Introduction Frequency on Organizational Performance

A Quantitative Study of Improvement Program Introduction Frequency on Organizational Performance

Author: 
Leo Fleming-Farrell
Program of study: 
D.B.A.
Abstract: 
Change program failure rates have a consistently high rate of failure of 75% for more than 30 years. The change program failure rates literature had focused on the behavioral issues associated with the leader follower paradigm. However, a review of the literature identified a gap in the relationship between frequency of change, leadership, change management, and organizational performance. The purpose of this quantitative research was to discover and measure the effects of the rate of change had on an organizations performance. A secondary purpose for the research study was the potential for the identification of the metric relationship between frequency of change and an organization’s performance to assist in the reduction of the high failure rates associated with change programs in industry. The dependent variables selected for this quantitative study were return on assets, overall equipment effectiveness, profitability, and product quality monitored the performance of the organizations. Data analysis was based on a sample size of n 37 The Independent variables chosen for this study were Improvement program name and frequency of Improvement program introduction. For each of the corelational data sets of the study the key findings show the p value was > .05. Thus, the data indicated that no significant relationship exists between the IV and the corresponding DV. Further Data analyses using the multivariate tests of Wilks, LawleyHotelling, and Pillai’s, tests for the independent variables of improvement program name and frequency of change indicated no significant main effects at alpha levels of .05 and .01
Dedication: 
For those who continually seek to expand the knowledge base and the people who support the learning environment.
Acknowledgements: 
This doctoral journey would not have been possible without the support of my mentor Dr. Elmer Hall who has shown limitless courage and tenacity in the endless reviewing, discussion, and objectivity applied to guiding this work to fruition. I thank my committee members Dr. Frank Czarny and Dr. Phillip Davidson for the continued support and encouragement during this journey and thanks to Dr. Jim Alstott a former committee member. Additionally, I acknowledge the assistance and guidance received from Dr. Chery Lentz and Dr. Judy Fisher Blando with APA editing. My, thanks to the Linkedin™ group owners for their willingness to grant access to their group memberships, without which this research would have been extremely difficult to conduct. During this journey, I was extremely lucky to have encountered and worked with classmates Dr. Jerry Worsham, Dr. Lisa Small, Dr. Eric Golla, and Mick Dee. To my family, my wife Loraine, and daughters Niamh, Dara, and Caoimhe without their endurance this journey would not have been possible I give my final thanks.