Quantitative Correlational Study of Non-clinical Factors, Physician-characteristics, and Physician Resource Allocation Decision-making

Quantitative Correlational Study of Non-clinical Factors, Physician-characteristics, and Physician Resource Allocation Decision-making

Author: 
Siba Abssi
Program of study: 
D.H.A.
Abstract: 
Since the introduction of health insurance financing and different reimbursement schemes, factors not related to patient conditions were introduced to the process of physician resource allocation decision-making (PRADM). The problem was non-clinical factors may be associated with PRADM and may result in limitation of services provided for an individual patient. Therefore, the quality of care may be compromised. The purpose of this quantitative correlation study was to analyze the degree of which a relationship exists between g non-clinical factors, physician-characteristics and PRADM in Saudi Arabia. Quantitative correlation design was applied. The data were collected using a new survey. The study population was physicians who work in Jeddah healthcare private sector. Random proportional sampling method was used. Pearson and Spearman correlations and multiple regression were used to analyze the data. PRADM scores correlated significantly positive with the out-of-pocket score, the physician’s productivity score, and age, and negative with the public sponsors score and the total insurance score. The study finding indicated a statistically significant relationship between nonclinical factors and physician-characteristics and PRADM. The implications of the study were to improve healthcare services consumer involvement in PRADM, adopt a new approach to insurance, improve young physician awareness of resource allocation prioritization, and provide polyclinics physicians a better access to required resources. Further research recommended include stakeholder satisfaction with resource allocation, other non-clinical factors relationship with PRADM, and factors affecting PRADM in the public sector.
Dedication: 
I dedicate this study to my wonderful husband Hadi and my sons Samy and Ramy. My husband, thank you for your love and support needed to complete this program. My sons, thank you for your patient when I was busy to be with you and your encouragement to finish my dissertation.
Acknowledgements: 
My profound appreciation to my committee chair, Dr. Jean R. Perlman for her total commitment, valued feedback, and insightful comments; for her calming influence during the dissertation long journey, always being available to me offering support and advice. I would like to thank Dr. Edilberto A. Raynes for providing thoughtful feedback and subject matter expertise. I would like to thank Dr. Holly Rick for being willing and dedicated committee members. I would also like to thank my former committee member, Dr. Brent Muirhead for his valuable time and feedback. I would like to acknowledge Ms. Carola Garfias, my former academic advisor, for her continuous encouragement and support to ensure my success. I am also very thankful for Mr. Chineme Moneke efforts as my current academic advisor. I would also like to extend a special thanks to my friends and colleagues, Ms. Mona Mohamed Elkalioby and Mr. Clyde Pondoc Solano for their support in data collection. I have also been lucky to have continuous dedication from my colleagues at Dr. Erfan & Bagedo General Hospital, supporting me with the necessary resources to complete my study. Finally, I would like to thank my family and friends for their continued support through this long journey. I am eternally grateful to have so many wonderful supporters.