A Quantitative Comparative Study of Youth Leadership and Problem Solving

A Quantitative Comparative Study of Youth Leadership and Problem Solving

Author: 
Anne Jacklin
Program of study: 
Ed.D.
Abstract: 
This study used a quantitative comparative method to measure differences in problem-solving scores after exposure to a leadership intervention in an after-school program. Based on the theoretical framework of Erikson’s Identity Theory, the purpose of the study was to investigate if leadership was related to youth’s ability to solve problems that might occur during a stage of development that was marked by crisis. The after-school model’s choice of pedagogy provided real-world context of leadership skills that were considered effective problem-solving strategies that could be used during challenging situations. The results of the comparative means test were insignificant indicating no association between leadership and problem solving among middle school youth, which resulted in acceptance of the null hypothesis. It was concluded that the investigation into the differences in problem-solving scores after exposure to leadership curriculum offered during an after-school, career exploration program suggested leadership was not related to youth’s ability to solve problems. Recommendations for further research and collection of evidence-based support for continuing the program to include acquiring a larger sample population to achieve adequate statistical power were proposed.