A Quantitative Analysis of Physicians' Behavioral Intention to Use technology in the Acute Care Setting

A Quantitative Analysis of Physicians' Behavioral Intention to Use technology in the Acute Care Setting

Author: 
Meta Johnson
Program of study: 
D.H.A.
Abstract: 
The 1999 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, To Err is Human, Building a Safer Health System, revealed that 44,000 to 98,000 deaths occur annually in United States’ hospitals due to preventable medical errors. Based on the findings of this study, health care experts recommended the use of computerized physician order entry (CPOE) to help minimize these occurrences. The enactment of federal initiatives such as Meaningful Use (MU) aims to facilitate the use of technology to aid in the improvement of health care delivery and patient safety. Many physicians reject the notion of the use of technology, specifically, computerized physician order entry (CPOE), in the provision of patient care despite the requirement by federal regulation. If hospital administrators hope to maintain a financially viable institution, they must understand the barriers that preclude physicians from accepting the use of technology. This study identified factors that predict physicians’ behavioral intention (BI) to use computerized physician order entry (CPOE) and the subsequent use of the technology. Seven predictor variables—performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence, facilitating conditions, attitude toward using technology, self-efficacy, and anxiety--and 4 moderating variables—gender, age, experience, and specialty--were evaluated. The results concluded a statistically significant relationship existed between performance expectancy, social influence and self-efficacy when moderated by gender, age, experience, and specialty to predict behavioral intention. Additionally, evaluation of physicians’ actual use of the technology concluded that behavioral intention determined subsequent use
Dedication: 
I dedicate this research to the millions of patients cared for in America’s health care system. May this research help to break down barriers and overcome obstacles precluding you from receiving quality and safe patient care. I also dedicate this research to all of my friends and family who have patiently waited for me to complete this work and have supported me through the process. I appreciate you all
Acknowledgements: 
I wish to thank each of my committee members for their expertise and precious time to help me accomplish this personal goal. First, to Dr. Talbert, my Chair, thank you for the patience and commitment you have shown me throughout this entire process and for believing in me when I sometimes did not believe in myself, for encouraging me when my spirit was low, and for lovingly forcing me to work on this paper when all of my energy was exhausted. Second, to Dr. Kelsey-Jenkins, thank you for saving my research. When I lost my third committee member, you came through for me—for that, I am eternally grateful. Last, but not least, Dr. Nieto, my constant, you have been with me since the very beginning—thank you for your unwavering dedication and support; your kindness will never be forgotten. I would also like to thank Dr. Leighton Smith and the staff of the medical records departments for allowing me to conduct my study and for providing me with assistance whenever I needed it. A special thank you to Sarah Bendle, Nicole Garbacik, Ruben Colon, and Carrie Pierrelus--know that you are my heroes. Lastly, to my friends and family who have supported and encouraged me throughout this process. I am thankful for each of you. Without your love, support and understanding this journey would have been a lot more difficult. Melissa Rego, thank you for the words you spoke to me that reignited my passion to complete this process. I am forever grateful to you.