A Qualitative Research Study: Redefining College-readiness in the Community College Writing Class

A Qualitative Research Study: Redefining College-readiness in the Community College Writing Class

Author: 
Herbert J. Hall
Program of study: 
Ed.D./CI
Abstract: 
The purpose of the qualitative grounded theory study was to explore redefining collegereadiness in the college classroom through the perceptions and experiences of community college writing instructors. The study population consisted of 12 English classroom and writing center faculty members. Data collection procedures included open-ended questions, face-to-face interviews and observations, and interviews assisted through mobile devices and computer technology to collect unstructured and non-numerical data appropriate for qualitative grounded theory research. NVivo 11 software facilitated the collection, analysis, and organization of interview and observation data. Qualitative research data collected, analyzed, and categorized demonstrated an emergent grounded theory, themes, and model. Meta-expositioning emerged as the grounded theory and the theme expositioning facilitated theory and model building. Feedbacking, adapting, and bettering emerged as revised minor themes from classroom observations. Primary and minor themes identified undocumented instructional strategies for sequencing student motivation and writing ability improvement. Results of the study demonstrated how college instruction helped first-year students’ advance from unpreparedness to readiness in the community college writing class. Meta-expositioning theory and model identified evidence of the skills and knowledge redefining the specialization of curriculum and the specificity of faculty instruction in the writing classroom. Further research regarding the classroom and college-level application of readiness may benefit practitioners, leaders, and scholars in the areas of first-year writing, instruction, reading, and learning
Dedication: 
I dedicate the completion of this research study to my mother and first teacher Audrey Branch Hall and to my father and mentor Nathaniel Hall, Jr. I dedicate the promise of lifelong learning to my sisters LaDorris Francine, Jacquelynne Nadine, and Freida Rochelle. What better joy was there then to share each Residency at the University of Phoenix with the love and support of family? Today, educational dreams hold much promise for the future learning of our family. I dedicate this evidence of achievement to my extended family whose individual dedication and commitment for learning will have to endure the evidence of my journey of leadership. A dedication is to the experience of leadership and inspiration to Brandon Francis. One thought by J. Joubert will remain constant to our family of educators: “to teach is to learn twice.”
Acknowledgements: 
In the beginning of this learning journey, I believed the success of my endeavors would only be possible with leadership and mentoring from faculty and staff at the University of Phoenix. I am very thankful for the leadership and support provided by the dean, faculty, and staff. I would like to acknowledge my dissertation committee for helping make this learning journey successful. I would like to specially acknowledge my dissertation chair and mentor Dr. Renee Hall whose continuous feedback, guidance, patience, and motivation was extremely helpful during each phase of the dissertation process. I would like to acknowledge dissertation committee member Dr. Natacha Billups-Thomas and dissertation committee member Dr. Mark McCaslin who provided feedback, guidance, patience, and motivation throughout this learning journey as well. I would like to acknowledge Dr. Jeremy Moreland, Dean, School of Advanced Studies, whose request for me to attend the Knowledge without Borders seminar at the University of Phoenix Learning Center in Detroit, MI, offered me an opportunity to realize how this doctoral journey may reach successful conclusions. This success of this journey would not have been possible without the help of Nate Perrizo, Senior Academic Counselor and Cara Ross, Senior Finance Advisor at the University of Phoenix. Thank you all so much for your continuous encouragement, diligence, time, and support.