A Qualitative Phenomenological Study of Managers to Reduce Conflict between Flight Attendants After a Merger

A Qualitative Phenomenological Study of Managers to Reduce Conflict between Flight Attendants After a Merger

Author: 
Threada L. Young
Program of study: 
Ed.D.
Abstract: 
Addressing job satisfaction among union and non-union flight attendants resulting from mergers and takeovers is becoming the norm within the airline industry. Leaders in the airline industry are challenged with communicating and collaborating with flight attendant groups who have differences in labor relations and trust leading to increased complaints and the lack of communication. Leaders are learning how problems stem from union and non-union groups may view trust and communication differently while working together after a merger. The purpose of the study was to explore the experiences and perceptions of managers and flight attendants to shed light on effective communication and leadership strategies to improve job satisfaction and team work. The findings support leaders in improving communication and job satisfaction while promoting change within the organization. A phenomenological exploration of the interview responses offered by 10 flight attendants and managers, both union and nonunion, highlighted employee mistrust, perceptions of workers feelings mistreated or misunderstood and the negative impact on trust due to a lack of cohesion. Union presence was felt to have a direct impact on flight attendant communications through supporting solidarity, cohesion, and job security. NVivo 10® qualitative analysis software was used in order to assist in the data coding and theme developments and patterns from the data (NVivo, 2006) by assisting in the classification (Moustakas, 1994), tracking the frequency of the data, sorting and arranging information from the data (Creswell, 2014). The qualitative results revealed themes that supported recommendations for improving communications, unity, and the organizational culture to support more successful mergers.
Dedication: 
I would like to dedicate this dissertation to God, my family and close friends. My beautiful and intelligent daughter Threada M. Young, who unconditional love and support gave me inspiration to move forward in spite of obstacles. My parent Mr. Charles Lewis Young, Jr., who encouraged me to complete my dissertation journey when I gave up after my mother, the late Janice Young made her transition. Mr. Claude Chapman, my daughter’s father who help raise my daughter and was always there for her when I was busy writing papers or in class. My paternal grandmother, Mrs. Edna Johnson-Norfleet who entrepreneurial and community activist spirit taught me not to be afraid of being strong and to never give up on myself. Threada Goodar, my maternal grandmother who instilled the importance of prayer, faith, tenacity and to always believe in myself. The Goodar Family, The Young Family, The King Family, The Jackson Family and The Monroe Family for many years of family love and support. I acknowledge my family friends, Mr. Theadious & Mrs. Willie Rankins, Mr. Thomas & Mrs. Sarah Diggs and Janet Diggs whose generosity and kindness will always be remembered for the amount of time spent on caring for my daughter while I worked and went to school and never asked me for anything. My loyal and long-time friend, Dr. Christina Michelle Jones who support and inspiration help me stay focus on completing my dissertation. Finally, Gloria Ann Wiley my daughter’s Godmother and dear long-time friend whose courage and sincerity brought attention to a health issue. Her honesty enabled me to revisit my diagnosis that eventually was instrumental in saving my life. And many others who supported and inspired me while crossing my path.
Acknowledgements: 
I would like to thank my mentor and committee members. My mentor Dr. Adolfo Gonzales was dedicated, supportive, committed, patient and exceptional during my dissertation process. Dr. Gonzales, I thank you for guiding and providing feedback that encourage me to continue on when there were moments when I wanted to give up or lost my way during my dissertation journey. Dr. Karen Lee and Dr. Valerie Sherwood, my committee members, I thank you for your dedication and support.