A Qualitative Instrumental Case Study: Adapting Law Enforcement Interview Trigger Behaviors to Technical Educational Tools

A Qualitative Instrumental Case Study: Adapting Law Enforcement Interview Trigger Behaviors to Technical Educational Tools

Author: 
Don Gemeinhardt
Program of study: 
Ed.D./ET
Abstract: 
The purpose of this qualitative instrumental case study was to research criminal trigger behaviors in law enforcement interview protocols to analyze the possibility of creating a more advanced training tool. In doing so, the study used a model employed in various distant training models and simulations today, the Department of Defense (DOD)-accepted simulation model, using the goals of familiarize, acquire, practice, and validate (FAPV) (Frank, Helms, & Voor, 2000; U.S. Army Signal Center & Ft. Gordon, 2014). Through its investigation of field data from interviews with personnel in various law enforcement agencies, studies of various interviews, interview theories, and an extensive literature review, this case study explored whether enough data are available to create an effective, new training tool for law enforcement communities. In this research study, the candidate interviewed subject matter experts in both law enforcement and intelligence interviewing and use of the FAPV simulation or distance learning model for the development of a technical education tool to begin to visualize some level of interviewing and training methodology that could be converted to a higher technical educational capability through simulation and web-related instruction. The research examined discussions with various law enforcement and intelligence personnel and FAPV developers regarding the most effective interviewing methods—ranging from an evidence-based or cognitive approach to a relationshipdevelopment or behavioral analysis approach—that would lead to changes in behavior through the trigger behaviors and pointers common to all interviews. Then, armed with this data, the paper discussed the possibility of creating the technological educational tool using the ADDIE process of Analyze, Design, Develop, Implement, and Evaluate to inform the FAPV simulation development.
Dedication: 
This paper is dedicated to all the men and women that risk their lives every day to ensure this country maintains law and order and the eternal search for the truth. I also want to dedicate this paper to my wife Connie who has been my support in this search for the understanding of truth. Her consideration and advice continues to help me understand my own personal truth in many ways every day.
Acknowledgements: 
I would like to first acknowledge the professionalism and cooperation of the Greensboro Police Department in Greensboro, North Carolina for their support in my research and, in particular, Dr. Lee Hunt for his assistance in the outstanding support throughout the department. I would also like to acknowledge Dr. Geoff Frank for his extensive expertise in the area of simulation and training model development that has inspired me to become an instructional designer, and also for his ever-present process awareness that continues to remind me to work on issues to get to their core concerns. I would also like to acknowledge retired FBI Agent Andy Bringuel, who has always given me the applied answer to all the many concepts on law enforcement interviewing and training but, more importantly, shown me the possibilities that are out there to understand human behavior. His ability to communicate methods in working people toward cooperating with law enforcement and changing their behavior away from threatening our society has been enlightening. I would like to thank Dennis Keith, who has also continued to give me a clear perspective on intelligence in the military, other federal agencies, and civilian corporate business. I would like to thank my Committee Chair, Dr. Carlos Aquino, who continued to support me no matter what the challenge—and there have been several—but all through this effort has continued to motivate me to work through the issues and do what it takes to complete the journey. His advice has always been encouraging. I would like to thank my committee member Dr. Kelley Walters for filling in at the last moment and my committee member Dr. Rob Hubal for his support and patience in this long journey. As the subject matter expert on my committee, Dr. Hubal has always continued to help me look at the applied point of view with this entire effort, and his wisdom in showing me ways to effectively communicate my ideas have been enlightening.