A Qualitative Case Study: The Process of Socialization from Parents who Home Educate Their Children

A Qualitative Case Study: The Process of Socialization from Parents who Home Educate Their Children

Author: 
Stacie McGlaughlin
Program of study: 
Ed.D./CI
Abstract: 
The purpose of this qualitative, exploratory case study was to explore the process parents implement to socialize their home schooled K-6th-grade children in the state of Ohio. The specific problem is the stigma attached to home-educated children regarding socialization. There is limited research from a qualitative perspective on how parents socialize home schooled children. Fifteen parents or guardians who have home educated at least one K-6th- grade child for at least two years were interviewed and answered questions that were designed to discover how each home educating family ensures socialization of their children. Major themes that emerged from all data sources were, the socializing process, social interaction of home-educated children, and how home educated children become successful adults. The results of this study found that parents or guardians who home educate their children do not implement a particular process to socialize their children. The most important thing that parents do to ensure that their home-educated children are socialized is to have them be actively involved in activities, programs, study groups, sports, youth groups, or church activities. Results also found that most students who are educated inside the home do not lack social skills and are socialized just as well as other students who are not home educated.
Dedication: 
dedicate this study to my husband, Devry, and children Brianna, and Elizabeth; they have endured the brunt of these past several years of my dissertation work. I simply could not have gotten to this place without their continual support, understanding, and love. My achievement is only possible because of their selfless contributions. Thank you! I love you all so much!
Acknowledgements: 
I would also like to acknowledge Dr. Christina Anastasia as my chair and mentor, Dr. Paula Wolfe and Dr. Robert Hauer as my committee members. I would also like to acknowledge Dr. Rhonda Gregg as my previous committee member and mentor. Their expertise and insight are invaluable. Their suggestions and questions make for a much more scholarly product, than I could ever achieve on my own. Thank you!