Productivity Change of Medical Practice Staff with Use of Electronic Health Records

Productivity Change of Medical Practice Staff with Use of Electronic Health Records

Author: 
Freddy Bécquer Moncayo Suárez
Program of study: 
D.M./IST
Abstract: 
A quantitative, retrospective panel study was conducted to explore the change in the staff productivity over time with use of electronic health records (EHRs). Participants included medical practices that have implemented EHR systems and have been using the system for at least one year. The study focused on the change over time of using EHR technology (the independent variable) on three indicators of staff productivity: time required for pulling, filing, and updating charts; time spent providing patients' records to other health care professionals; and number of patients seen by provider per month (the dependent variables). The study surveyed and reported quantitative data on the 16 participating small and medium-sized medical practices related to the evaluation of these identified metrics related to productivity. The data were collected in one wave related to two points in time (pre-EHR and one-year post-EHR). The results of this research study suggested that that there is no significant change in the time required for pulling, filing, and updating charts, and in the number of patients seen by provider per month with the use of EHRs. However, suggestive evidence of change was found with less time spent providing patients' records to other health care professionals, which may represent increase of productivity staff with the use of EHRs. The sample, data analysis and the metrics used to evaluate productivity staff, led to the conclusions but other productivity metrics or a larger sample may confirm or reject these results.
Dedication: 
This dissertation is dedicated to my closest family consists of my wife Jimena, and my beloved children Alejandra, Elizabeth, and Benjamin. I also dedicate this dissertation to my parents who put the seed of knowledge search in my early years. Thank you all for being part of my life, which helped me, cope and overcome the obstacles in this lifelong learning journey I have chosen. This achievement is part of our success.
Acknowledgements: 
I thank my family who created the appropriate environment to complete this journey and believed in me. I thank Dr. Michael Solomon, my dissertation committee chair, who encouraged me to complete this dissertation and guided me through this long and difficult process. Without his help and guidance, I could not complete this research study. I thank my committee members, Dr. Julie Ballaro, who always motivated me, helped me to find the right path, and provided me the insight and expertise required to generate solutions to continue with this research study, and Dr. Maria ReGester, who enrolled in the last stage of this journey and contributed to complete this process. I thank Dr. Jeffry Olivas, Dr. Gloria Lewis, and Dr. Litz Dietz, who as experts in Management of Health Information in medical practices, dedicated some time to review the instrument used in this research study. I also thank all the people from the medical practices who were open-minded to participate in this research study. In summary, I thank you all who helped me to achieve this invaluable milestone in my lifelong learning journey.