Process of Knowledge Preservation and Transfer: Leadership Practices in the Aerospace Industry in Washington State

Process of Knowledge Preservation and Transfer: Leadership Practices in the Aerospace Industry in Washington State

Author: 
Vasyl Dmytriv
Program of study: 
D.M.
Abstract: 
This qualitative collective case study involved an examination of leadership challenges in the aerospace manufacturing industry in the U.S. state of Washington. This study focused on how leaders can (a) resolve the knowledge gap and develop a competitive advantage by building a culture of knowledge sharing and (b) transform manufacturing workers into technical, highly skilled production professionals by driving multigenerational legacy knowledge in talented individuals. The concept of a knowledge economy helped identify and contextualize these practices. The study was designed to provide new knowledge about organizational leadership for leaders and managers responsible for: (a) strategies that cultivate a knowledge-sharing culture, to close knowledge gaps between workforce generations; (b) knowledge preservation strategies; and (c) initiating a further round of advancement in the aerospace industry. The outcome of the central research data indicated a significant effect of a knowledge-sharing culture on the employees' behavior regarding sharing their knowledge without considering the personal risk of becoming less valuable and threatening their job security. The review of the literature, the data analysis, and the conclusions all revealed that a multigenerational workforce needs leadership that leads well, for example by creating events at which the seeds of innovation are planted and nurturing a climate for a healthy environment where workers to share their knowledge without concerns for job security.
Dedication: 
The journey was long, which helped me reflect on the newest learned knowledge and then to select the building blocks in the structure of personal wisdom. I dedicate this dissertation to my Lord Jesus Christ, who stands with me during my lifetime journey. I believe that God supported me through it all. Without my strong faith, belief, and promises to God that I would finish this task, I would not have been able to scale this five-year hurdle, which I thought I would complete in three, along with any other priorities in life. I want to thank my family, who have supported and encouraged me throughout this endeavor. I thank you for your sacrifices and understanding. Two months after I started this journey in 2009, I lost my brother Vlad in a tragic accident. My happiness at being a doctoral student turned into a time of sadness. It turned my life upside down. For the next 3 years, I struggled to balance my loss with pressures at my workplace, the ministry, and at home. It created a void that constantly reminds me that life is a gift from God, and we must be thankful daily for seeing the beauty of His creation. I thank to my younger brother, Tony, for his belief in me. I am dedicated to my father and mother, Andriy and Kateryna, for the fruit of love that made me arrive on this planet. Thank you for years of sacrifice, love, and prayers without which I could not have completed this journey. Thanks to spouse Natalya, daughter Helen, sons William, and Michael – three years of age – those are the followers who daily polished at me the skills of the servant leadership to serve them without asking for a reward.
Acknowledgements: 
I was born into a Christian family in Ukraine and at the age of 12, where I got the message that Christians have no future in a society of the current regime – they are obsolete. I turned my hope to God, by asking Him in leadership through the life. I made a commitment to Him that I will find the way of freedom; I will achieve academic success to speak loudly about His work in a life of the followers. I got my bachelors degree in Odessa in the Soviet Union and then a master’s degree in Seattle in the United States, and finally in 2009 I began my doctoral journey. I experienced a remarkable journey with many sacrifices, challenges, discoveries, and rewards. I would like to thank my dissertation chair and committee members Dr. Vadim Jigoulov, Dr. Gail Gessert, and Dr. Martin Gunnell. Dr. Jigoulov, I am extremely grateful for your support and truly appreciate the timely manner in which you examined my research and provided critiques, feedback, and practical suggestions. It was an honor to know and work with you. I acknowledge my committee members for their valuable assistance and prompt feedback. Finally, I would like to acknowledge the individuals who volunteered to participate in this study, because without their willingness to share their lived experience, this study would not have been possible. To all of you, I say, "Thanks!" With God, all things are possible; just listen to His voice.