Policy Characteristics for the Prevention of Workplace Bullying Anteceded by Heterosexism: A Delphi Study

Policy Characteristics for the Prevention of Workplace Bullying Anteceded by Heterosexism: A Delphi Study

Author: 
Scott A. McCalla
Program of study: 
D.M.
Abstract: 
Since the 1969 Stonewall riots in New York City, LGBTQ individuals have orchestrated a significant movement toward equality; however, heterosexism, and workplace bullying are still prevalent concerns for LGBTQ workers. This is important because workplace bullying has been found to cause psychological and physical illness, and been found as a cause for reduced organizational effectiveness. Therefore, the purpose of this Delphi study was to build consensus about organizational diversity practices or policies that can help to diminish the risk of workplace bullying. Following the theoretical foundations of status inconsistency theory, social identity theory, procedural justice theory, and heteronormativity theory, the research questions for the study examined what characteristics of current diversity policies can and should organizational leaders use, and what practices or policies organizational leaders must address to diminish the risk of workplace bullying of LGBTQ employees. The study employed a manual constant comparative analysis, measurement of median scores, and ranking measurements to analyze data collected through a three round Delphi study of human resource and diversity experts. Cronbach’s Alpha was measured to determine study reliability. Based on 26 items with consensus, the expert panelists further conceded on seven top recommendations. This study contributes to social change by helping inform organizational leaders, politicians, advocacy groups, and scholars on recommendations to help safeguard the mental and physical health of employees, safeguard the operational effectiveness of an organization, and reduce workplace bullying of LGBTQ and other marginalized employees.
Dedication: 
This dissertation is dedicated to my parents Barbara and Robert McCalla. Your lifetime commitments to educating children, and providing a safe and caring environment for children from all socio-cultural backgrounds to learn and excel is inspiring. Thank you for your love, support, inspiration, and encouragement. I would like to express the deepest appreciation to my wife and my three daughters who have endured my time away from familial duties and offered me their unwavering support as I worked on this research. I would also like to dedicate this dissertation to all employees who have been marginalized and bullied. It is my hope that this work and other similar work will be used to improve working environments. I dedicate this work to you, and hope you find the support and strength to overcome the challenges you face.
Acknowledgements: 
I would like to thank my committee chair Dr. Leah Hollis, who has demonstrated and demanded high levels of research, scholarship, and an excitement regarding this research. Without her guidance, this dissertation would not have been possible. Likewise, my committee members, Dr. Lockwood and Dr. Paluch provided guidance, time and expertise. I appreciate their contribution to this work. I would like to acknowledge the many instructors I have had at University of Phoenix. Your professionalism, knowledge, and your commitment to quality have made me a better scholar, practitioner, and leader. I would also like to acknowledge my past organizational leaders, some who used or required bullying as a management tactic. Your actions or inactions largely forged my desire to search for a solution to the problem of workplace bullying. Finally, I would like to acknowledge a couple of my fellow peer doctoral students. Sheila and Terresa you seemed to know when I needed help or support. Thank you for being such great students, teammates, and friends.