Planner Technical Skills, Intelligent Transportation Systems Inclusion, and Deployment: A Correlational Study

Planner Technical Skills, Intelligent Transportation Systems Inclusion, and Deployment: A Correlational Study

Author: 
Sally J. Palmer
Program of study: 
D.M./IST
Abstract: 
The research explored a barrier to intelligent transportation systems (ITS) deployment. The purpose of the research involved understanding whether practitioner technical skills correlated to the frequency by which planners’ incorporated ITS within planning studies and whether projects resulting from studies managed or performed by technically-skilled practitioners more frequently reached deployment status. The predictor variables in the research included planner composite technical skills (composite ITS skill [PV] and composite IS/T skill [PV]) and planner inclusion of ITS in transportation and transit planning studies (PV). The criterion variable reflected three different project status groups for which separate data collection occurred: deployed, active, and completed study (CV). Transportation and transit planners across the United States participated in the research. The research incorporated a correlational design employing survey methodology. Participants used the Planner Skills and ITS survey instrument to provide data. Multiple regression was used to test significance of correlation between the variables. In the active and completed study project status groups, the null hypotheses were rejected in favor of the alternate where p = .023 and p = .001, respectively. In the deployed status group, p = .117, thus retaining the null hypothesis. The conclusion drawn from results indicated that the higher a planner’s ITS skills, the more frequently a planner included ITS in planning studies, and the more frequently those study-related projects reached deployed status.
Dedication: 
I dedicate this endeavor to my father, Ernest Edison Palmer, Jr., and to my daughter, Teisha Louise La Beau. My father passed at an early age and missed the opportunity to see me reach my potential, but the pride visible in his eyes during my first procession always compels me forward. My daughter overcame a number of significant personal challenges affecting her educational efforts. Persevering, Teisha graduated high school, attended Le Cordon Bleu Culinary Institute, and became an artist. I wish to share with Teisha the pride I feel for her and to extend to her my thanks for all the years she shared me with my own educational pursuits.
Acknowledgements: 
I extend my gratitude to my Dissertation Chair, Dr. Michael Vandermark and to my committee members, Dr. Frank Appunn and Dr. Libi Shen, for accepting roles so critical to my success. I am grateful to my family for the gentle teasing about being a lifelong student that encouraged me to finish this path. I thank Sarah Wuertz for pushing me forward when I felt as if I were sinking. I thank Christ Dimitroplos and Lisa Yahraus for assistance at work and offering encouragement when most needed. I acknowledge the services of Dr. James Baxter who spent an extensive amount of time providing tutoring in understanding the finer nuances of statistics. I sincerely appreciate and acknowledge Dr. Julie Conzelmann for her patience as my writing coach and technical editor. I also extend my thanks to Dr. Laster B. Walker, Dr. Ricardo H. Archbold, Dr. William Farrell, and Susan Manness for guidance through the earlier stages of this endeavor. I extend my gratitude to the leaders from my past and present: Dr. Jameela Pugh, Dr. Derar Serhan, Annie Boozer, Mary Ann Roder, Jennifer Toth, Scott Omer, Michael Kies, and Denise Scafide for their encouragement, leadership, guidance, flexibility, understanding, and support. Finally, I extend my gratitude to all the practitioners who participated in my research; their time and attention permitted my success.