A Phenomenological Study of Ex-foster Care Hispanic and African American Women's Perceptions During Secondary Education

A Phenomenological Study of Ex-foster Care Hispanic and African American Women's Perceptions During Secondary Education

Author: 
Sylvia Galvez
Program of study: 
Ed.D./CI
Abstract: 
The purpose of the qualitative research was to explore how ex-foster care Hispanic and African America women, ages 19-26 perceived the challenges of secondary education while they lived in group homes during their teenage years in San Diego, California. The phenomenological study included observations, lengthy interviews stimulated by questions aimed at understanding the ex-foster care Hispanic and African American women’s perceptions, perspectives, and the phenomenon under question. The research included procedures for analysis, main conclusions, and implications. The research question was, how do ex-foster care Hispanic and African American women perceived challenges in secondary education while living in group homes during their teenage years in San Diego California? The qualitative observation involved participants’ behaviors and activities in their environments. During the study process, the researcher conducted face-to-face interviews with open-ended questions that brought out views and opinions of the participants. The research discovered that some foster care girls experienced at least one of several negative challenges while living in group homes in California, such as difficulty building relationships, the loss of high school credits, the subsequent need to repeat class work, enrollment in continuation schools, academic failure, and anger arising from all of these negative experiences. These negative challenges are serious problems in San Diego, California High Schools. The researcher, in this study investigated and examined the reasons why this problem occurs in foster care group homes. The words adolescent and teenage are used interchangeably to describe the Hispanic and African American foster care girls in this study.
Dedication: 
I dedicate this dissertation to my heavenly Father who gave me the wisdom and guidance that prepared me to accomplish my dream. I devote this dissertation to my mentor, editor, friend, and husband, Herb. L. Cawthorne, I could have not completed this dissertation without you. To my three sons, Marvin, Mario, and Brandy. To my brothers and sisters, Oscar, David, Hortenica, and Rachael Galvez. To my 11 grandchildren. I devote this dissertation to Sullivan’s Group Homes former foster care clients, the County of San Diego, Health and Human Services, Residential Services, Community Care Licensing, Residential Department, and the fourth district in San Diego, California. I dedicate this dissertation to my loving mother, Josie Galvez, who believed in me, supported me through this process, and showed me what hard work is all about. To my loving father Oscar Galvez, step-mother Belia and step Sister Diana Galvez, who supported me through my education. I love you, all!!
Acknowledgements: 
I thank God for my earthly angels, my Chair, Dr. Engler, and my two committee members, Dr. Lao and Dr. Enright who believed in my research project. I love you all for being patient with me through this educational journey. Dr. Robert Enright, thank you for being a role model, friend, and my spiritual brother through this process. Your literature on Forgiveness Education is what connected us. God said to trust in him with all my heart and not lean on my own understanding and in all my ways acknowledged him, and he will make my path straight (Proverbs 3:4-5) and He did. I love you, Jesus!