A Phenomenological Exploration of Issues and Opportunities on Physician Usability of Electronic Medical Record Adoption

A Phenomenological Exploration of Issues and Opportunities on Physician Usability of Electronic Medical Record Adoption

Author: 
Moses Oladele Taiwo
Program of study: 
D.M./IST
Abstract: 
This qualitative phenomenological research explored physicians’ perceptions and lived experiences of the effect of information technology on medical practice that revealed obstacles to adoption. The slow adoption of EMRs in medical practice remained a problem, despite the federal government incentive packages for physicians to use the new technology in their practices. Amidst political, economic, and safety concerns, extensive advancements in healthcare information technology have militated for the adoption and use of the EMR systems by physicians in the United States. But the current rates of EMR adoption have yet to achieve the expected results in quality control, cost reduction, and implementation of new methods in healthcare. A purposive sample of 19 physicians voluntarily participated in face-to-face interviews by responding to open-ended questions concerning this subject. Moustakas’ modified van Kaam method (1994) was used for the resulting data analysis. Five major themes emerged from the phenomenal analysis that was categorized as Challenges: (a) loss of control; (b) lack of operability; and Benefits: (a) physician access to information; (b) support for physician decisions; and (c) financial improvements. Two minor themes also emerged from each category in the study. Knowledge gained could serve as an impetus for healthcare leaders to modernize workplaces and remove barriers that potentially impact physician-patient relationships. Replication of this study is recommended, using different demographics to explore perceptions of generational populations, geographic culture differences, and sizes.
Dedication: 
This dissertation is dedicated in loving memory to my grandmother, the late Mrs. Comfort Abeke Olasinde, who always believed in me and inspired me to be the best that I could be. She always gave me her unconditional love, the kind of love that only a grandmother could provide. Rest in peace Mama!
Acknowledgements: 
Thank you to Dr. Julia Bao for being my dissertation mentor. Your positive attitude was exactly what I needed to recharge and finish this dissertation. Thanks also are extended to Dr. Mary Lind and Dr. Jamiel Vadell for serving in my committee. Their individual support and flexibility are appreciated more than they may understand. I want to acknowledge my wife, Dr. Chioma Taiwo, our son, Emmanuel, and our two daughters, Margret and Grace. I am so proud of each of you for your words of encouragement I needed to complete this study. I want each of them to remember it is possible to complete a doctoral program and live to talk about it. It is important to always keep your eyes on the prize, and forge ahead. Thank you to my financial sponsor, Dr. Adedeji Adeleke, Chairman/CEO of the Pacific Energy Company Limited, Nigeria, who has always been there for me and my family since coming to the U.S. in 1997. I owe you than what can be acknowledged here! Lastly, I want to acknowledge the practicing medical doctors who agreed to assist in this study, as my co-researchers. The research participants clearly demonstrated a perfect mix of art and science, caring, and professionalism. I really appreciate the time and interest shown by each of you in this research effort.