A Phenomenological Exploration of Faculty Experiences Using Lecture Capture Systems

A Phenomenological Exploration of Faculty Experiences Using Lecture Capture Systems

Author: 
Pamela S. Vande Voort
Program of study: 
Ed.D.
Abstract: 
The purpose of this qualitative, phenomenological study was to describe the perceived experiences of faculty who use lecture capture systems in face-to-face class meetings at small and medium-sized, four-year, highly residential, undergraduate colleges and universities with enrollments between 1,000 and 9,999 students. Through audio-recorded semi-structured telephone interviews, 17 faculty shared their perceptions and experiences using lecture capture in their face-to-face classrooms. Analysis of interview transcript data provided answers to one primary research question and three central research questions. The following 10 themes emerged: Pedagogy and instructional content; Presentation style; Innovative uses; Technical support and technology capabilities; Institutional leadership and lecture capture adoption; Dynamics of class discussion; Understanding course content; Attendance; Educational benefit; and Instructional tool. The findings add to the current literature that lecture capture is an emerging technology being used successfully at higher educational institutions in the United States. The prevailing perception among interviewed participants was that lecture capture is easy to use, does not harm the face-to-face classroom experience, and offers significant benefits for many students. Data derived from this research study may be valuable to higher education leaders to determine if installation of lecture capture systems is warranted and advisable based on its effect on the instructional process. Further research regarding lecture capture systems may provide higher education leaders greater understanding of the effects of this new technology.
Acknowledgements: 
My sincere appreciation is expressed to my dissertation committee for their support, insight, feedback, and commitment to my research study. I would like to acknowledge my dissertation chair, Dr. Janice Novello along with my dissertation committee members, Dr. Allatia Harris and Dr. Deborah Hutti. I would like to acknowledge the doctoral program faculty. Through my coursework, I have increased my knowledge as a scholar, practitioner, and leader. I am grateful to the participants from colleges and universities across the United States who shared their experiences and assisted in making this research possible. Thank you to my family, friends, and doctoral cohort who continuously provided encouragement during this academic journey.