Personalized Instruction, Academic Achievement, Knowledge Application, and Problem-solving Skills: A Correlational Study

Personalized Instruction, Academic Achievement, Knowledge Application, and Problem-solving Skills: A Correlational Study

Author: 
Jacques Alexandre
Program of study: 
Ed.D.
Abstract: 
Supported by the cognitive theory of multiple intelligences, Personalized Instruction is implemented in school districts across the United States (Gardner, 1983; Tennyson, 2010). Personalized Instruction, a research-based teaching innovation, was implemented with fidelity in City Department of Education (CDOE) schools as an effective instructional strategy to promote academic achievement, knowledge application, and problem-solving aptitude was investigated in the quantitative correlational study (Enyedy, 2014; Lunenburg, 2011; Yonezawa, McClure, & Jones, 2012). A sample of 347 public school students was selected from various middle schools and high schools in CDOE to examine the bivariate relationship between four predictor variables for Personalized Instruction (PI) with fidelity (blended learning, experiential learning, individualized instruction, and independent study) and three criterion variables (academic achievement, ability to apply knowledge, and ability to use problem-solving skills). The results of the study revealed that a positive relationship between: (a) The implementation of blended learning, academic achievement and knowledge application, except for 2013 – 2014 English Language Arts (ELA); (b) the implementation of experiential learning and problem-solving ability in 2014; (c) the implementation of individualized instruction, academic achievement, knowledge application, and problem-solving ability; and (d) the implementation of independent study, academic achievement, knowledge application, and problem-solving ability. The results revealed that a positive relationship between academic achievement and knowledge application except in 2014-2015 Math for high school students, 2015 ELA for the 6th graders, 2013 ELA for the 8th graders, and 8th grade.
Dedication: 
This dissertation is dedicated to my wife, Shanda, and my children, Emilie, Jannessa, and Jannelle. My family has been a source of support throughout the doctoral journey. Despite the constant busy schedule, sudden deadlines of assignments, and moments of stress, my family encouraged me to persevere and continue. I would like to extend appreciation to each of my family members who supported me and allowed me to vent in trial times. I hope and pray that my children will follow that positive legacy and continue to be lifelong learners. I also dedicate this dissertation to my brother-in-law, Dr. Achille Antoine, who never cease to provide spiritual and material supports to me during the course of the journey. Thanks mom and dad for implanting the importance of quality education into my life. To all my sisters, Esther, Maud, Merline, and Gersende, thank you for your prayers and your words of encouragement.
Acknowledgements: 
I would like to acknowledge the assistance of my University of Phoenix academic counselors who called me from time to time to inquire about my progress in the program. I would like to thank Dr. Carol A. Holland, my dissertation chair, for her guidance and encouragement throughout this process. Dr. Holland has been extremely helpful and encouraging throughout the entire process. I would like to thank Dr. Stephen Mercer and Dr. Chris Enslin for serving on my committee and making available your expertise by providing a wealth of feedback and advice. To all my spiritual brothers and sisters, Marylyn, Eton, Rue, Heather, Dr. Ferguson, I thank you for the willingness to help me during the process.