Personality Predictors of Compassion Fatigue in Direct Patient Care Employees Working in a Long-term Care Environment

Personality Predictors of Compassion Fatigue in Direct Patient Care Employees Working in a Long-term Care Environment

Author: 
Rachel Woodrume
Program of study: 
Ph.D./IO Psych
Abstract: 
Research to investigate personality as a predictor of compassion fatigue was completed for direct patient care workers in a long-term care environment. A total of 234 participants were surveyed for personality type and level of compassion fatigue. The hypothesis of various combinations of personality types being the key indicator for whether participants would be more likely to experience compassion fatigue was denied. The conclusion of the study yielded tenure was a greater indication of various personality types emerging from people in long-term care settings rather than levels of compassion fatigue emerging in these same individuals. Such results imply personalities of people may change over time the longer the individual is exposed to a work environment. Implications for organizations are to monitor employee personalities so negative traits within each type of personality based on the Big Five Personality profile, that are negatively impacting patients and family members are addressed before there is an issue within the facility.
Dedication: 
I dedicate this dissertation work to my Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. You have given me the gifts, abilities, strength, and humor to get through this process. Without your love, I would not be where I am today. Thank you for your wisdom, direction, and ever-constant peace.
Acknowledgements: 
First, I want to thank my family and friends who have supported me during this process. Specifically, Mom, Maw-maw, William, Aunt Neese, and “my bear” Adam are living heroes for loving me through the mountains and valleys of this degree and life in general. A separate thanks to Dad, Steven, Granny, Grandpa, and Uncle Pat, my angels of courage, who despite being in heaven, have created just the right moments of encouragement throughout my degree-earning years. There are others who should be named who have lifted me up when I felt like quitting. For their love and support, there is not enough paper in which to express my gratitude. Next, I want to thank my committee members, Dr. Powaser, Dr. Rhode, and Dr. Hakim for their wisdom, direction, and challenges throughout this process. These committee members, in addition to my classmates, are the mortar to all of the pieces laid on the path of this journey. I am a better person for knowing these people. Lastly, I want to thank the women of the past whose leadership, tenacity, and “true grit” have empowered me to leave my own piece of history. A few of these women I pay thanks to are Joan of Arc for showing me how to have courage, Jackie Kennedy for reminding me to live with class, Mother Teresa for reminding me to be humble, and Hellen Keller for demonstrating her ability to never give up despite the obstacles. Without these women as constant images of the woman I would like to be, I would not have had the specific compass needed to point me in a successful direction.