The Perceptions of Physicians and Nurses on Hospital Acquired Infection Prevention: An Exploratory Case Study

The Perceptions of Physicians and Nurses on Hospital Acquired Infection Prevention: An Exploratory Case Study

Author: 
Lorna R. Assi
Program of study: 
D.H.A.
Abstract: 
Hospital acquired infections (HAIs) continue to be a problem within United States health care organizations. Specifically, despite focused preventative HAI measures, there continues to be a lack of knowledge on how hospitals might improve the prevention of HAI transmission from the perspective of a population placed at the forefront of patient care, namely physicians and nurses. A qualitative exploratory case study design allowed for an in-depth analysis of the participants’ perspectives in regards to HAI transmission and factors affecting HAI prevention. Using a purposive sampling, 18 participants were selected. Participants’ responded to open-ended interview questions designed to explore factors that hinder and/or facilitate the transmission of HAIs. A field test was conducted to validate the interview questions. NVivo 11 was used as a qualitative tool to assist in organizing and analyzing the data. Five themes emerged: communication, workload, education, enforcing regulation, and equipment/supplies. Communication included issues between health professionals and between the organizations. Workload included the increasing patient to nurse/physician ratio and retaining employees. Education included educating new hires, patients, and families. Enforcing regulation included organizational and employee enforcement of infection prevention protocols. Equipment and supplies included the restocking of proper supplies for infection prevention on the floor and in patient rooms. The study included five recommendations for health care leaders to implement in the prevention of HAI transmission. The study concluded with suggestions for future research regarding the prevention of HAI transmission through perceptions of frontline health care professional.
Dedication: 
I dedicate this study to my children, for their patience and understanding. To my daughter, Fabianna, never stop learning and reach for the stars. To my husband, who continued to support me throughout my doctoral journey. You were my verbal punching bag while I was a rollercoaster of emotions throughout this journey. To my parents, who have worked hard most of their lives in providing only the best and highest level of education for their children and teaching us the value and importance of an education. To my siblings, who have helped me tremendously with the kids and the continuing family support system. Lastly, I dedicate this study to the health care community, for their continuation and advances in improving the quality of care to patients.
Acknowledgements: 
I would like to acknowledge my dissertation team: Dr. Linnaya Graf, my dissertation mentor and chair, I’m very fortunate to have had you. Thank you for your patience. Your continuous encouragement and uplifting approach helped me tremendously, especially at moments when I wanted to give up. My committee members, Dr. Bruce Laviolette and Dr. David Pardo, thank you for the encouragement, patience, support, and feedback. I could not have completed this journey without the help of each of you. Thank you all so much!