Perceptions of Physician Communication Between Diabetic African American Patients, and Caregivers of Diabetic Patients

Perceptions of Physician Communication Between Diabetic African American Patients, and Caregivers of Diabetic Patients

Author: 
Angela D. Curington
Program of study: 
D.M.
Abstract: 
The continued rise of diabetes placed more people with the disease at risk of developing complications that reduced their quality of life. Communication is essential in helping patients to adhere to treatment plans and medical therapy. Development of strategies that enhanced effective physician-patient communication could impact the quality of care diabetic patients received and reduce the risk of medical complications. Diabetes management required patients to follow the recommended treatment plans communicated by physicians that include diet, physical activity, and self-monitoring of blood glucose. This descriptive comparative and correlational study examined (a) the differences in the perceived quality of physician’ communication between African American diabetes patients and caregivers of African Americans diabetes patients, and (b) the relationship between the patients’ age and patients’ perception of quality physician communication. Sixty-four, African American patients with diabetes 20 years of age or older, and 64 caregivers were the participants for this study. The study began with 128 participants who responded to the Communication Assessment Tool (CAT), which consisted of a total of 20 questions. Based on the questions answered in the survey used in this study there was not a significant difference the perception participants had of how well physicians communicated during office visits. The study also concluded that here was also no significant relationship between the patients’ age and perception of how well the physician communicated.
Dedication: 
This dissertation is dedicated to Lorraine Powers, who stood by me, held my hand, and encouraged me when the days were dark and the journey seemed too long. I dedicate this dissertation to my brothers and sisters, Jonathan, Nathan, Cheryl, and Carol, whom I love dearly. Thank you for traveling with me through this long journey. Finally, I dedicate this dissertation to my wonderful parents, who are no longer here. There was never a day that passed when I did not think of you and how proud you would be of me. You taught me to love others and treat them with respect, you demonstrated how to be patient, resilient, and most of all how to fight and never giving up. I honor you for all of the sacrifices that you made, the life lessons, and examples you set before me. I love you Mom and Dad.
Acknowledgements: 
The encouragement of so many people during this journey made it easier to get through. I first, want to thank My Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, who gave me the vision, showed me the way and never left my side. I also want to thank Dr. Carla Lane-Johnson, my mentor, for her words of inspiration, wisdom, and guidance along with my committee members, Dr. Michael Chase and Dr. Sharon Fountain.