Perceptions of Faculty Preparedness for Developing, Evaluating and Revising BSN Curriculum

Perceptions of Faculty Preparedness for Developing, Evaluating and Revising BSN Curriculum

Author: 
Meredith L. Roberts
Program of study: 
Ph.D./NUR
Abstract: 
Nurse educators are barraged with competencies, standards, outcomes, and initiatives to consider when developing, evaluating, or revising curriculum. The constructivist grounded theory study discovered and compared the perceptions and processes of faculty related to their preparedness and confidence in evaluating, developing, and revising nursing curriculum. Faculty’s constructions were used to develop a middle range descriptive theory Challenged and Overwhelmed. From further faculty recommendations on strategies Supported and Empowered: a Model of Understanding to Support Faculty’s Growth and Competence in Curriculum Development, Evaluation, and Revision was created to support faculty’s growth and competence in curriculum development, evaluation and revision. Findings such as the low confidence found in most faculty, including the very experienced when it came to assessing curriculum, and the inadequate knowledge of curriculum as well as strategies discovered to benefit faculty are shared that assist faculty’s growth and competence in curriculum development, evaluation and revision. These strategies can be used to improve faculty development, educational strategies, and graduate education, resulting in better nurse educator preparedness. Improving educational strategies through better competency will improve the nursing profession. Educator competency, preparation, the faculty shortage, standards, initiatives, and educational competencies and curriculum reform were reviewed. Quality information for educators is provided for evaluating and improving current nursing curriculum, and to guide strategic planning and facilitate nurse program success. Faculty perceptions of how to increase competence, and improve preparation for their role developing, evaluating and revising curriculum were shared.
Dedication: 
I dedicate my dissertation to my husband David Ginter, whose support and patience were essential for my sanity and well-being, and to my daughter Dr. Victoria Cummings. We are the first two doctors in our family. I thank God and my ancestor’s spirits that include my parents, and my husband’s parents, three of which died during the last five years, the angels who watched over me, and my friends who stuck by me when I had little time to share. You sustained my spirit. Without you I would not have succeeded.
Acknowledgements: 
I would like to acknowledge and thank several people. First, Dr. Judith Treschuk, I am indebted to you for mentoring me through the completion of my doctoral journey. I would also like to acknowledge and thank my devoted committee members, Dr. Ruth Grendell, for her supportive words of encouragement when I needed them most, and Dr. Ela-Joy Lehrman, who first taught me about curriculum, and who has seen this journey to completion. I also thank the remarkable nurse educators I had the privilege to interview. You are extraordinary men and women who work beyond what is expected or required. Though you had little time, you shared time with me striving to improve the profession. Your assistance was vitally needed, and together nurses make a difference