The Perceived Role of Physician-administrators

The Perceived Role of Physician-administrators

Author: 
Felipe Valerio
Program of study: 
D.H.A.
Abstract: 
The purpose of this qualitative descriptive single case study was to examine how nonadministratively trained physicians perceive serving in administrative positions. In-depth interviews were conducted with a sample of 20 physicians working in administrative positions within a single health care facility in Central Florida. Data collected were transcribed and entered into NVivo software for ease of analysis. Ten themes emerged from this study, including formal training is not necessary, longer hours, and seeing the big perspective. Formal administrative or leadership training was not necessary for success, and these skills could be learned on the job through a gradual transition to administrative duties. Physicians might be more successful as they transition into administrative roles if they are informed about the changes that are likely to occur to their working conditions and personal lives. Physicians who serve in administrative roles appreciate all parts of a medical practice or hospital as opposed to only particular function as a physician. Transitions to administrative roles supported the idea that physician-administrators can bring significant benefits to health care organizations. Participants viewed the transition into administration as a positive use of their skills and knowledge and an opportunity to apply experience gained throughout their career. With an increasing number of physicians appointed to manage health care, an increasing need has developed to understand the challenges physician-administrators experience. Health care administrators may use the findings of this study to provide guidance to physicians who are transitioning into administrative roles.
Dedication: 
I would like to dedicate this dissertation to my lovely wife for her ongoing encouragement that kept me motivated through my difficult times and who never doubted my capacity to finish it. To my grandfather, Jesus E. Aveledo for his love and guidance in my early years and who did not have the opportunity to see me complete this educational journey. A special dedication goes out to my two precious children who are everything to me and who I want to show the meaning of strive for success. Finally, to my parents, for being proud that I have achieved this level of education in this great nation thousands of miles away from them.
Acknowledgements: 
This dissertation was made possible by the support of my family who cheered me during every step of my journey and sacrificed spending more time together. I would like to acknowledge my chair Dr. Barbara Fedock and committee members, Dr. Maureen Marzano and Dr. Kathleen M. Healy-Collier for their academic professionalism, patience, and guidance as I achieved each milestone. I extend my gratitude to all the physiciansadministrators who took time out of their busy schedule to share their perceptions with me. Without them, this would not have been achieved. Finally, I thank God for the abundance of his blessings he has poured upon me.