Perceived Leadership Style and Job Satisfaction: Analysis of Instructional and Support Departments in Community Colleges

Perceived Leadership Style and Job Satisfaction: Analysis of Instructional and Support Departments in Community Colleges

Author: 
Ruben Johnson
Program of study: 
D.M.
Abstract: 
The purpose of this quantitative descriptive correlational study was to measure the relationship between the subordinate’s perceived style of leadership of their leader and the subordinate’s level of job satisfaction while assigned to various instructional and support departments within one of the North Texas community college districts. The job satisfaction of the employees of the instructional and support departments within a community college is a necessity for the survival of the educational institution. The foundation of job satisfaction is based on the professional relationship established between the leader and their subordinates, and whether or not the subordinates are satisfied with their jobs. The participants in this study completed two survey instruments: Multifactor Leaders Questionnaire, 1995 or MLQ-5x (see Appendix E) and Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire, 1967 or MSQ (see Appendix G), and a Demographic Questionnaire (see Appendix D). The current study results suggested the relationship between the perceived leadership styles (independent variables - transactional, transformational, and laissez-faire) and overall job satisfaction (dependent variable) for the employees who worked in the instructional and support departments. The current study results indicated a sufficient relationship between the MLQ-5x sub-categories of both transformational and transactional leadership styles and job satisfaction (MSQ) in both departments. The results indicated a negative relationship between laissez-faire leadership style and job satisfaction in both departments. In addition, the findings of the current study have leadership implications for college administrators, managers, supervisors, and the subordinates.
Dedication: 
I hope this study will encourage leaders to learn more about their style of leadership and how it impacts the job satisfaction and productivity of their subordinates, while serving in a community college environment. I dedicate this dissertation to my mother, Gloria E. Gary (Irizarry), who passed away in October 1992. Mamma, I love you and thanks for the opportunity that you gave to me while on earth to give hope and encouragement to others who are less fortunate than me. May God be with you until we meet again. “But without faith, it is impossible to please him; for he that cometh to God must believe that he is, and that he is a rewarder of them that diligently seek him.” HEBREW 11:6.
Acknowledgements: 
First and foremost, I thank God Almighty for the opportunity and the ability that he granted me to complete this dissertation in lieu of my challenges and setbacks. I thank my wife, Demetriss A. Johnson, for her unconditional love and ongoing support during the long nights and weekends. I thank my children, Angellica M. Johnson, Gabrielle M. Johnson, and Tre A. Beacham for their love and putting up with me while I strived to accomplish this goal. Thanks goes to my brothers, Ivan L. Johnson, Anderson L. Johnson, and Willie E. Johnson and their families, for their love and support as I strived to accomplish this goal. Special thanks to my administrative assistants, LaTasha Adams, Leah Durham, Sandie Harcourt and Shellye Lyons, who constantly reminded me to set aside time to write, edit, and then write some more. I appreciate the support and understanding provided by my colleagues at Cedar Valley College (Executive Deans - Dr. Mickey Best, Dr. Rabarb Fares, Jennie Pollard, and Lisa Nightingale) and the entire Dallas County Community College District. I express my deepest appreciation to my mentor, Dr. Christopher Van Ness, who provided guidance, hope, and a swift kick when I needed it. Dr. Van Ness’ guidance was timely, clear, and consistence. Also, I appreciate the encouragement and direction given by my committee members, Drs. J. Paul Gallagher and Neil Mathur. Without their timely feedback, this dissertation would not have been possible. Many thanks go to my peers and friends, Drs. Betty Hearns, Robin WashingtonWhite, Tuesday Hambrick, and Sheila Lamar for their continuous push and inspiration. Special thanks to Russell Haynes, who challenged daily not to quit. vi Special thanks to my pastor, Dr. Rodney D. Dulin, and church family at the Central Pointe’ Church of Christ for their prayers, encouragements, and well wishes. Also, I want to give special thanks to Brother David L. Chandler, Rodney E. Craft, Christopher B. Crear, Duane L. Johnson, Jerome Madison, James D. Mitchell, Demetrice Sanders, and Willie J. Tucker, and their families for their continuous faith in me to complete this task. Special thanks to Drs. Jennifer Wimbish, Wright L. Lassiter, Zena Jackson, Elsie Burnett, and Nancy Cure’ for the part they played in help making my research to become a reality. I also want to thank my statistician and colleague, Mathewos Kassa, for helping me to understand the steps of collecting the data and presenting it in a meaningful manner. I truly appreciate everyone who had a hand in helping my dream to come to fruition. The influence of one’s circle is a powerful instrument.