Patient and Family Engagement Initiative: A Quantitative Causal-comparative Analysis

Patient and Family Engagement Initiative: A Quantitative Causal-comparative Analysis

Author: 
Kerrie L. Roberson
Program of study: 
D.H.A.
Abstract: 
Patients and families play an important role at the bedside, and that is making sure the transition of care among providers is safe and effective. Bedside shift report (BSR), a type of patient and family engagement, is a process where patients, families, and health care providers work together as partners to improve the quality and safety of hospital care. In 2010, TJC developed and revised the standards for patient-centered care, which were designed to improve the safety and quality of care for patient and family involvement. The purpose of this quantitative descriptive study with a causalcomparative design was to compare two dependent variables of patient and nurse satisfaction from the pre-and post-implementation of BSR as a patient and family engagement strategy and determine if BSR resulted in a positive return on investment for a health care organization. This quantitative descriptive study employed Donabedian’s structure-process-outcome (SPO) approach model. This model is a foundation for modern health care quality measurement, studying the structures of process and outcome, and the means to an end of a relationship. The data analysis utilized both descriptive and inferential statistics. The mean and standard deviation were calculated on two dependent variables, nurse satisfaction and patient satisfaction. Both research questions were measured using Chi-square to compare the difference in the yearly data for patient satisfaction and nurse satisfaction pre-and post-implementation of BSR as a patient and family engagement strategy on a surgical unit. The dependent variable patient satisfaction is statistically significant and the dependent variable nurse satisfaction is not statistically significant. Each year, post-implementation BSR for both dependent variables had a positive trend
Dedication: 
I dedicate this dissertation to my family and my colleagues for their support, strength, and encouragement during my doctoral journey. I am especially thankful and grateful for my beloved husband Eric who made my academic dream a reality; my daughter Caitlin, who encouraged me and studied along side of me; and my parents, Robert and Patricia Brothers, who instilled in me the importance of an education and provided endless support.
Acknowledgements: 
I would like to acknowledge and thank my chair, Dr. Julia Aucoin for her constant support, guidance, scholarly expertise, and commitment to genuinely wanting to make me a scholarly practitioner. The moment Dr. Aucoin interviewed me to become my chair, we both knew a connection was made. To my committee members: Dr. Barbara Coleman for her guidance, expertise, and continually providing encouraging comments and suggestions to make my dissertation process a gratifying experience; Dr. Catherine Garner for being there for me from concept to fruition of a published paper that I can be proud of, and always encouraging me to strive to achieve excellence. I would also like to acknowledge my preceptor, Dr. Bonne Johnson who provided support, endless sessions of lending her ear, leadership expertise, and made sure I had all the tools I needed to complete my journey.