One-to-one Mobile Technology and Standardized Testing: A Quantitative Ex Post Facto Study

One-to-one Mobile Technology and Standardized Testing: A Quantitative Ex Post Facto Study

Author: 
Aquil F. Bayyan, Sr.
Program of study: 
Ed.D./ET
Abstract: 
This quantitative, ex post facto study examined the impact a districtwide high school one-to-one mobile technology initiative had on the number of 10th grade students in the Forney Independent School District (ISD) (Texas) who passed their standardized TAKS tests during the 2010 academic year. The research study used annual public Forney ISD (Texas) data obtained from the Texas Education Agency (TEA) website. The study compared the 2009 academic year when 10th grade students (n=520) did not have one-to-one mobile technology and the 2010 academic year when 10th grade students (n=530) were able to use one-to-one mobile technology as their personal school and home device. Findings from the study determined if there was a statistically significant relationship between one-to-one mobile technology and the number of 10th grade students who passed their standardized TAKS tests during the 2010 academic year. With a chisquare critical value of 3.84 the results of the study showed a statistically significant relationship between the number of 10th grade students who passed their TAKS tests in 2010 with one-to-one mobile technology. In 2010, the number of 10th grade students who passed the English Language Arts test increased by 5% (92% to 97%) with a chi-square statistic of 12.86. The number of students who passed the Math test increased by 18% (65% to 83%) with a chi-square statistic of 44.39. The number of students who passed the Science test increased by 12% (70% to 82%) with a chi-square statistic of 21.04. The number of students who passed the Social Studies test increased by 6% (90% to 96%) with a chi-square statistic of 14.79. The number of 10th grade students who passed all of their TAKS tests increased by 18% (57% to 75%) with a chi-square statistic of 38.67. The theoretical framework was constructed by the dual coding theory of Alan Pavio and the multiple intelligence theory of Howard Gardner.
Dedication: 
I would like to dedicate this dissertation to my wife, Alemtsehay “Alem” and my two children, Aquil, Jr. “Mehari” and Baiza. I am forever indebted to you for your love, understanding, and sacrifice through this process. I appreciate my wife taking care of the familial duties and sacrificing some nights alone while I was conducting research and typing papers. I remember nights when my children told me that they did not want me to leave, when I had to go out and study. I also remember the night when my son told me at the age of five that he wanted me to study and work hard. It was not an easy time, but you stayed there with me and encouraged me to continue. I would also like to dedicate this to my mother, Ikhlas, and my father, Ramadan, Sr., who have been working in the field of education since the late 1970s and are still contributing to the field. They are also finishing Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) programs of their own. As an African-American male who was born in Philadelphia, PA (USA) in 1977, I would like to dedicate this work to people of all colors who sacrificed their lives through the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade, Jim Crow Era, Civil Rights Movement, and various injustices that paved the way so I could have this opportunity.
Acknowledgements: 
I would like to thank God and the Lord Jesus Christ for giving me the opportunity and strength to complete the course work and program. Many people have helped me along during this arduous and challenging process. My wife, children, family, friends, and church ministries prayed earnestly for this to be completed. I would like to thank my Committee Chairperson, Dr. Irene Chen, who has challenged and guided me through this entire dissertation process. I appreciate her knowledge, insight, and help given whenever I needed it. I would also like to thank my committee members, Dr. Seth Langley and Dr. Jeremy Tutty, for their expertise, continued encouragement, and support. I would like to thank Dr. Katrina Zimmer for her help and expertise while serving on my committee. I would also like to thank Dr. Bentley Parker, Dr. Thomas Seaberry, Dr. Hannah Swamidoss, and Dr. Joseph Bradshaw for their consistent encouragement and collaboration through the process while we worked at Rowlett High School (TX). I would like to thank Dr. Saul Mendoza, Dr. John Burdett, Dr. Matthew Endsley, Dr. Victor Nixon, Dr. Brant Perry, Dr. Rose Jones, Dr. Bethany Poston, and Dr. Curtis Ray for their input, insight, and collaboration while working in Plano ISD. I want to thank the principals who inspired me in my early years as a teacher in Washington, DC, to pursue this goal by following their examples: Dr. Kenneth Jones and Dr. David Stofa. I would like to thank the superintendents I have worked for during this process: Dr. Curtis Culwell, Dr. Bob Morrison, Richard Matkin, Steve Fortenberry, and Dr. Brian Binggeli. I would also like to thank the principals I have worked for in Garland ISD (TX) and Plano ISD (TX) during this coursework: Dr. Marlene Hammerle, Michelle Bounds, Lynn Ojeda, Bill McLaughlin, and Janis Williams. I would like to thank Plano ISD district administrators: Susan Modisette and Renee Godi for believing in me.