Mentoring Program Alumni Views on Program Efficacy in Shaping Their Leadership Ability: A Case Study

Mentoring Program Alumni Views on Program Efficacy in Shaping Their Leadership Ability: A Case Study

Author: 
Ervin Christie Jr.
Program of study: 
D.M.
Abstract: 
The purpose of this qualitative exploratory case study was to explore what role mentoring has on African American males achieving a leadership position within organizations. Semi-Structured interviews were conducted with 20 African American male alumni of Student African American Brotherhood (SAAB), a college-based mentoring program. An exploratory case study methodology was used to explore the views and experiences of these men. The following themes were evident from the data collected, 1) educational success 2) mentoring attitudes, 3) the differences between college and professional level mentoring, 4) professional success, 5) leadership style and identity, 6) mentoring implications for the glass ceiling phenomenon, 7) mentoring perceived influence in making leaders, and 8) satisfaction with mentoring and mentoring programs. Results of the study showed that the participants enjoyed their time as members of a formal mentoring program and all of the participants saw the experience as meaningful to their collegiate success and professional practices. Results of the study also showed that the participants attributed most of their professional success and the capability to obtain a position of leadership to their time in SAAB. The results of the study are profound to the problem of the Glass Ceiling for African American males. Participating in a mentoring program can aid the mentee to spiritual growth, leadership development, and professional success. Theoretical and leadership implications, limitations, and recommendations are discussed. Suggestions for future research are also included.
Dedication: 
This dissertation is dedicated to my children Miles and Faith. You do not have to choose your father’s path; you are free to choose your own. I pray for the best for you and hope that you can have all that you want in life. This dissertation is also dedicated to my late grandmother, Ms. Annie Jackson. Before you left, I told you my plan for getting that last degree and you looked as you did and told me that sounds like a good plan. I would like to also dedicate this study to all of those who ever wanted to achieve something but thought it was impossible. I wanted to let you know that all things are possible; all that is required is for you to make a plan and execute it.
Acknowledgements: 
As I reflect on who all helped to make this journey complete, I could spend the entire pages of this document to do so. However, I would like to acknowledge those who paved a way for me to achieve this goal. I would like to say thanks to my family for being there for me during my ups and downs and for their general support especially my mother Ms. Myra Lockhart. I would also like to thank those friends, cohorts, and associates who gave me inspiration, pats on the back, and those opportunities to take a break from time to time. I would also like to thank Meshonda Moore for being a special cohort, who was a great sounding board and could give great advice about this process. You are up next! To Dr. Tyrone Bledsoe and the amazing men of SAAB, your help with this project was amazing and I truly could not have done it without you. I would like to give a special thanks to Doc who showed me that mentoring matters. I would like to acknowledge my Dissertation Chair, Dr. Damon Cary, and my committee members Dr. Sha-Shonda Porter and Dr. Charles Park. Thank you for sticking with me these past few years. I would also like to acknowledge the late Dr. Yolindra Greene; before she transitioned, she told me how much she believed in me and how much she loved my study. That meant a lot. Remember, “I can do all things through Christ that strengthens me” Phil. 4:13. Anything is possible.